Forest Physiography: Physiography of the United States and Principles of Soils in Relation to Forestry (Google eBook)

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J. Wiley & sons, 1911 - Forest soils - 759 pages
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Page 570 - From the mouth of Churchill River, Hudson Bay, the northern boundary of the great transcontinental spruce forest follows the shore closely for a few miles, then curves gently inland. Thence it extends northwesterly, crossing Island Lake, Ennadai Lake on Kazan River, and Boyd Lake on the Dubawnt. The next dividing point is just north of 60 on Artillery Lake. From this point the line curves southwesterly crossing Lake Mackay south of latitude 64. The banks of the Coppermine are the boundary to...
Page 69 - Although the characteristics of the lime-flora are clear and distinct, yet in the past the influence of lime upon vegetation has been overestimated. Indeed, a distinction has been made between calciphilous and calciphobous plants. Recently it has been definitely established that the amount of lime in itself, in so far as it does not operate physically, can not be the cause of differences in the flora, for not only can...
Page 466 - XIII. The Champlain sub-stage (marine). XII. The glacio-lacustrine sub-stage. XI. The Later Wisconsin, the sixth advance. X. The fifth interval of deglaciation (as yet unnamed). IX. The Earlier Wisconsin, the fifth invasion. VIII. The Peorian, the fourth interglacial interval. VII. The lowan, the fourth invasion. VI. The Sangamon, the third interglacial interval. V. The lllinoisan, the third invasion.
Page 570 - Alders occur in more or less dwarfed conditions in favorable places well within the treeless area, and several species of willows, some of which here attain a height of 5 or 6 feet, border some of the streams as far north as Wollaston Land. These are the only trees which occur even in a dwarfed state in the Barren Grounds proper.
Page 760 - Voice and literature, 245-246 14 DAY USE RETURN TO DESK FROM WHICH BORROWE1 LOAN DEPT. This book is due on the last date stamped below, or on the date to which renewed. Renewed books are subject to immediate recall.
Page 188 - The nonforested catchment area, which, during December, experienced a run-off of 40 per cent. of the rainfall, and which during the three following months had a run-off of 95 per cent. of the precipitation, experienced a run-off in April (per square mile) of less than...
Page 724 - This is vegetable matter consisting of roots and fibres, moss, etc., in various stages of decomposition, occurring as turf or bog, usually in low situations, always more or less saturated with water, and representing an advanced stage of swamp with drainage partially established." MUCK. " This type consists of black more or less thoroughly decomposed vegetable mold, from 1 to 3 feet or more in depth and occupying low, damp places, with little or no natural drainage. Muck may be considered an advanced...
Page 335 - Forest conditions in the Absaroka division of the Yellowstone Forest Reserve, Montana, and the Livingston and Big Timber quadrangles, by JB Leiberg.
Page 112 - A normal duration of a temperature of 50 for less than a month fixes very well the polar limit of trees and the limits of agriculture. Near this line are found the last groups of trees in the tundras. A temperature of 50 for four months marks the limit of the oak, and also closely coincides with the limits of wheat cultivation.
Page 539 - Portsmouth series. The Portsmouth series is characterized by dark-gray to black surface soils, underlain by yellow, gray, or mottled yellow and gray subsoils. The dark color of the soils is due to an accumulation of organic matter during an earlier or existing swampy condition. This series may be considered as intermediate between the lightcolored Norfolk soils on the one hand and the Peat and Swamp areas on the other. The members of the series occupy depressed areas, or areas so flat that the water...

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