Acts of the General Assembly of the State of Virginia: Passed in 1866-67, in the Ninety-first Year of the Commonwealth (Google eBook)

Front Cover
James E. Goode, printer, 1867 - Law - 1037 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 757 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 763 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested or burthened, in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge or affect their civil capacities.
Page 757 - That government is, or ought to be, instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security of the people, nation, or community; of all the various modes and forms of government, that is best which is capable of producing the greatest degree of happiness and safety, and is most effectually secured against the danger of maladministration; and...
Page 758 - ... that no man be deprived of his liberty, except by the law of the land or the judgment of his peers. 9. That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
Page 760 - No soldier, seaman or marine in the army or navy of the United States shall be deemed a resident of this state in consequence of being stationed therein.
Page 508 - Resolved by the senate and house of representatives of the United States of America in congress assembled (two-thirds of both houses concurring,) That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several states as an amendment to the constitution of the United States...
Page 763 - No law shall embrace more than one object, which shall be expressed in its title, nor shall any law be revived or amended with reference to its title, but the act revived, or the section amended, shall be re-enacted and published at length.
Page 757 - ... all men, having sufficient evidence of permanent common interest with, and attachment to, the community, have the right of suffrage, and cannot be taxed or deprived of their property for public uses without their own consent, or that of their representatives so elected, nor bound by any law to which they have not, in like manner, assented, for the public good.
Page 765 - The Legislature may declare the cases in which any office shall be deemed vacant, where no provision is made for that purpose in this Constitution.
Page 758 - That a well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty; and that, in all cases, the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.

Bibliographic information