The works of Francis Bacon (Google eBook)

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1819
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Page 375 - STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight is in privateness and retiring ; for ornament, is in discourse ; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business. For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one ; but the general counsels, and the plots, and marshalling of affairs come best from those that are learned.
Page 258 - It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other. He that dies in an earnest pursuit, is like one that is wounded in hot blood; who, for the time, scarce feels the hurt; and therefore a mind fixed and bent upon somewhat that is good, doth avert the dolours of death; but, above all, believe it, the sweetest canticle is, 'Nunc dimittis' when a man hath obtained worthy ends and expectations.
Page 376 - Bowling is good for the stone and reins, shooting for the lungs and breast, gentle walking for the stomach, riding for the head, and the like. So if a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics ; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again ; if his wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the school-men, for they are Cymini sectores. If he be not apt to beat over matters and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another,...
Page 111 - The End of our Foundation is the knowledge of Causes and secret motions of things, and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
Page 269 - HE that hath wife and: children, hath given hostages to fortune; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief.
Page 335 - It is good in discourse and speech of conversation to vary and intermingle speech of the present occasion with arguments; tales with reasons; asking of questions with telling of opinions; and jest with earnest: for it is a dull thing to tire, and, as we say now, to jade anything too far.
Page 320 - For there is no such flatterer as is a man's self ; and there is no such remedy against flattery of a man's self as the liberty of a friend.
Page 278 - ... whether thou didst not best at first. Neglect not also the examples of those, that have carried themselves ill in the same place : not to set off thyself by taxing their memory ; but to direct thyself what to avoid. Reform therefore, without bravery OF scandal of former times and persons ; but yet set it down to thyself, as well to create good precedents, as to follow them.
Page 502 - Wherefore, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath...
Page 365 - GOD ALMIGHTY first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures ; it is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks...

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