Investigations Representing the Departments: Romance Languages and Literatures, Germanic Languages and Literatures, English ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, 1903 - English literature - 347 pages
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Popular passages

Page 158 - As Plautus and Seneca are accounted the best for comedy and tragedy among the Latines, so Shakespeare among the English is the most excellent in both kinds for the stage...
Page 159 - The First part of the Contention betwixt the two famous Houses of Yorke and Lancaster...
Page 94 - SEASON of mists and mellow fruitfulness. Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun ; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run ; To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core...
Page 82 - And the Naiad-like lily of the vale, . . ' Whom youth makes so fair and passion so pale, That the light of its tremulous bells is seen Through their pavilions of tender green...
Page 172 - Be thou blest, Bertram ! and succeed thy father In manners, as in shape ! thy blood, and virtue, Contend for empire in thee ; and thy goodness Share with thy birth-right...
Page 104 - To speak of you, ye mountains, and ye lakes And sounding cataracts, ye mists and winds That dwell among the hills where I was born. If in my youth I have been pure in heart. If. mingling with the world, I am content With my own modest pleasures, and have lived With God and Nature communing, removed From little enmities and low desires, The gift is yours...
Page 93 - In youth we love the darksome lawn Brushed by the owlet's wing; Then, Twilight is preferred to Dawn, And Autumn to the Spring. Sad fancies do we then affect, In luxury of disrespect To our own prodigal excess Of too familiar happiness.
Page 175 - As it hath been sundrie times publikely acted by the right honourable, the Lord Chamberlaine his seruants. Written by William Shakespeare. LONDON Printed by VS for Andrew Wise, and William Aspley. 1600.
Page 343 - DURING THE first year that Mr. Wordsworth and I were neighbours, our conversations turned frequently on the two cardinal points of poetry, the power of exciting the sympathy of the reader by a faithful adherence to the truth of nature, and the power of giving the interest of novelty by the modifying colours of imagination.
Page 94 - Close bosom-friend of the maturing Sun ! Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run ; To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core ; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel...

Bibliographic information