Artists past and present: random studies (Google eBook)

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Moffat, Yard, 1909 - Artists - 176 pages
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Page 156 - Let others study Art: Rome has somewhat better to do, namely War and Dominion.' Rome and Greece swept Art into their maw and destroy'd it; a warlike State never can produce Art. It will rob and plunder and accumulate into one place, and Translate and Copy and buy and sell and criticize, but not make.
Page 156 - Earth, was a mighty giant and wrestler, whose strength was invincible so long as he remained in contact with his mother Earth.
Page 108 - It is sometimes supposed that the drama consists of incident. It consists of passion, which gives the actor his opportunity; and that passion must progressively increase, or the actor, as the piece proceeded, would be unable to carry the audience from a lower to a higher pitch of interest and emotion.
Page 36 - ... sometimes scolded by his contemporaries (for example, the stern Elizabeth Luther Carey of the New York Times, who was perhaps not so far wrong in her estimate of Klinger: "We may say that his drawing is sometimes poor, his imagination clumsy, his treatment of a subject coarse, but . . . out of his figures looks the spirit of life more often defiant than noble, more often capricious than beautiful, but not to be mistaken.") Although Klinger was a painter and a sculptor (his realistic, polychrome...
Page 81 - ... strongly individualized and differentiated. St. John in particular reveals, in the beauty of feature, and expression, Crivelli's power to portray subtleties and refinements of character without sacrificing the sumptuous taste for accessories and ornament. The Saint, wearing his traditional sheepskin and bearing his cross and scroll, bends his head in meditation. His brows are knit; his features, ascetic in mold, and careworn, are eloquent of serious thought and moral conviction. By the side of...
Page 81 - ... grace and tenderness. The Virgin, mildfaced and melancholy, is seated on a marble throne. The Child, held on her arm, droops his head, heavy with sleep, upon her hand in a babyish and appealing attitude curiously opposed to the dignity of the Child in Mantegna's group which hangs on the opposite wall. At the right and left of the Virgin are St. Peter and St. John, St. Catherine of Alexandria, and St. Dominic, wholelength figures strongly individualized and differentiated. St. John in particular...
Page 126 - Be clumsy rather than elegant: dress yourselves in furs, skins, and woolens, make yourselves things that are in harmony with your heavy bodies, and make everything in bright strong colors; yes, in the so-called gaudy peasant colors which are needed contrasts to your deep green pine forests and cold white snow.
Page 32 - Great diversity of character and temperament are displayed in the expressive curves of the plump young faces, and the eyes, in particular, questioning, exultant, wondering, reflective or merry, betray a penetrating and subtle insight into the dawning personality under observation.
Page 80 - The Madonna and Child Enthroned, surrounded by Saints,' is the most elaborate and pretentious of the National Gallery compositions, but fails as a whole to give that impression of moral and physical energy, of intense feeling expressed with serene art, which renders the 'Annunciation' both impressive and ingratiating.
Page 80 - The lower central compartment is, however, instinct with grace and tenderness. The Virgin, mildfaced and melancholy, is seated on a marble throne. The Child, held on her arm, droops his head, heavy with sleep, upon her hand in a babyish and appealing attitude curiously opposed to the dignity of the Child in Mantegna's group which hangs on the opposite wall. At the right and left of the Virgin are St. Peter and St. John, St. Catherine of Alexandria, and St. Dominic, wholelength figures strongly individualized...

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