From the deep woods to civilization: chapters in the autobiography of an Indian

Front Cover
University of Nebraska Press, 1936 - Biography & Autobiography - 206 pages
8 Reviews
In an earlier book, Indian Boyhood, Charles Alexander Eastman (Ohiyesa) recounted the story of his traditional Sioux Childhood and youth. From the Deep Woods to Civilization, first published in 1916, continues the narrative, beginning with his abrupt entry into the mainstream of Anglo-American life in 1873 at the age of fifteen. Eastman went on to become one of the best known educated Indians of his time, receiving a Bachelor of Science degree from Dartmouth in 1887 and a medical degree from Boston University in 1890. From his first job as physician at Pine Ridge Agency, where he witnessed the events that culminated in the Wounded Knee massacre, he devoted his life, both in and out of government service, to helping his fellow Indians adapt to the white world while retaining the best of their own culture.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
3
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: From the Deep Woods to Civilization

User Review  - Zach - Goodreads

Eastman's memoir is written in careful and dignified prose and details the events of his transition from native life to "civilization." The memoir begins with the author's extraction from his tribe by ... Read full review

Review: From the Deep Woods to Civilization

User Review  - Micah - Goodreads

The first half was much more fascinating to me, but the entire book was a well written autobiography. I definitely recommend reading this if you're interested in a first-hand account from a member of the Dakota. Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER PAGE I The Way Opens
1
My First School Days
14
On the White Mans Trail
31
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1936)

A Santee Sioux, born in Red Falls, Minnesota, Charles Eastman was raised by his grandmother and uncle in Manitoba, Canada, where he learned Native American traditions and lore. As a teenager he returned to his father's family and attended mission schools and Beloit College. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1887 and from Boston University School of Medicine in 1890. Although his background made him unwelcome in some parts of white society and his education made him uneasy in Native American cultures, he worked for his people throughout his life as a doctor, as a representative in Washington, D.C., and as a founder of the Society of American Indians. His first published book, Indian Boyhood (1902), written for children, tells the stories and traditions of the Sioux nation. Red Hunters and the Animal People (1904), Old Indian Days (1907), and Wigwam Evenings (1909), written with the help of his wife, Elaine Goodale Eastman, continue in this vein, but his later work, including The Soul of the Indian (1911), The Indian Today (1915), and his autobiography, From the Deep Woods to Civilization (1916), attempts to interpret Native American culture for white society, describing the problems of assimilation.

Bibliographic information