Alabama, Her History, Resources, War Record, and Public Men: From 1540 to 1872 (Google eBook)

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Barrett & Brown, 1872 - Alabama - 712 pages
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Page 42 - And be it further enacted, That the following propositions be, and the same are hereby, offered to the convention of the eastern State of the said territory, when formed, for their free acceptance or rejection, which, if accepted by the convention, shall be obligatory upon the United States: First.
Page 42 - December llth, 1816.) pie of the said state, the same to be used under such terms, conditions, and regulations as the legislature of the said state shall direct: provided the said legislature shall never sell nor lease the same, for a longer period than ten years at any one time.
Page 43 - The legislatures of those districts or new states, shall never interfere with the primary disposal of the soil by the United States in Congress assembled, nor with any regulations Congress may find necessary for securing the title in such soil to the bona fide purchasers. No tax shall be imposed on lands the property of the United States; and in no case shall non-resident proprietors be taxed higher than residents.
Page 43 - That the people inhabiting said territory do agree and declare that they forever disclaim all right and title to the unappropriated public lands lying within said territory, and that the same shall be and remain at the sole and entire disposition of the United States...
Page 50 - The Creek tribe of Indians cede to the United States all their land, East of the Mississippi River.
Page 42 - That five per cent. of the net proceeds of the lands lying within the said Territory, and which shall be sold by congress...
Page 232 - Beneath the rule of men entirely great The pen is mightier than the sword.
Page 62 - America," and henceforth ceases to be one of said United States, and is, and of right ought to be, a sovereign and independent State.
Page 1 - What constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud, with spires and turrets crowned; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No: MEN, high-minded MEN...
Page 42 - December next, after deducting all expenses incident to the same, shall be reserved for making public roads and canals, of which three-fifths shall be applied to those objects within the said state, under the direction of the legislature thereof, and two-fifths to the making of a road or roads leading to the said state under the direction of Congress.

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