The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

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Wordsworth Editions, 1996 - Fiction - 457 pages
14 Reviews
Laurence Sterne's The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman is a huge literary paradox, for it is both a novel and an anti-novel. As a comic novel replete with bawdy humour and generous sentiments, it introduces us to a vivid group of memorable characters, variously eccentric, farcical and endearing. As an anti-novel, it is a deliberately tantalising and exuberantly egoistic work, ostentatiously digressive, involving the reader in the labyrinthine creation of a purported autobiography. This mercurial eighteenth-century text thus anticipates modernism and postmodernism. Vibrant and bizarre, Tristram Shandy provides an unforgettable experience. We may see why Nietzsche termed Sterne 'the most liberated spirit of all time'.
  

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Review: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

User Review  - Jeremy - Goodreads

I wanted to like this, I really did. Sterne is a hugely inventive, hugely capable writer. Maybe he doesn't go in for the batshit linguistic free-for-all that people like James Joyce do, but he is ... Read full review

Review: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

User Review  - Dan Risch - Goodreads

TS is one of my favourite books. It bears repeat reading fantastically, and to me has acted like a sort of literary touchstone. By this I mean that after reading the text, I wanted to find out whether ... Read full review

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About the author (1996)

Irish-born Laurence Sterne was an eighteenth century English author and Anglican clergyman. Though he is perhaps best known as a novelist, Sterne also wrote memoirs, articles on local politics, and a large number of sermons for which he was quite well known during his lifetime. Sterne's works include The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy, and the satire A Political Romance (also known as The History of a Good Warm Watch-Coat). Sterne died in 1768 at the age of 54.

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