Family Hiking in the Smokies: Time Well Spent

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Univ. of Tennessee Press, 2009 - Sports & Recreation - 100 pages
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Family Hiking in the Smokies is specifically geared toward taking children on excursions into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park--the most visited national park in the United States. The park offers much to its nearly ten million annual visitors. For families who seek fun along with educational recreation, the park boasts splendid views and enormous biological diversity.

While the guide book concentrates on shorter day hikes, the book also presents longer trails for overnight or weekend camping. Organized by regions of the park, the forty-two concise trail descriptions include many of the most popular destinations, such as Ramsey Cascades, Grotto Falls, and Clingmans Dome Tower, as well as overlooked gems such as Midnight Hole, Lynn Camp Prong, and Juney Whank Falls. This fourth edition includes new trails not found in the book's previous editions, and all are presented in a user-friendly format.

This delightful volume also includes specific advice regarding safety, trail difficulty, and keeping children's attention. In addition, Family Hiking in the Smokies provides interesting educational sidebars about fauna, folklore, and material culture along the way. This book, based on the experiences of three expert hikers who have walked with their own children and grandchildren in the park, will provide parents and grandparents with a perfect guide for establishing an adult/child bond with the natural world.

Hal Hubbs, Charles Maynard, and David Morris have hiked together and with their families for many years. The three friends formed Panther Press, which originally published Waterfalls and Cascades of the Great Smoky Mountains, along with many other titles on natural history, particularly in the Smokies. Hal, Charles, and David have worked as volunteers in the Smokies and have hiked in many national parks throughout the country. But as long time East Tennessee residents, they especially want families to enjoy the trails of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  


  

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Review: Family Hiking in the Smokies: Time Well Spent

User Review  - David Ward - Goodreads

Family Hiking in the Smokies: Time Well Spent by Hal Hubbs, Charles Maynard, and David Morris (UT Press 2009)(917.6889). This is a well-written book on Smokies hiking. It is like reading Kenneth Wise lite. My rating: 7/10, finished 2010. Read full review

Contents

Big CreekCataloochee
1
Midnight Hole and Mouse Creek Falls
3
Mt Sterling
5
Little Cataloochee
6
Caldwell Fork and Boogerman Loop
8
Woody House
10
Hen Wallow Falls
13
Mount Cammerer
14
Clingmans Dome 25 Clingmans Dome Tower
49
Andrews Bald
51
Cades CoveTownsend
53
Upper Meigs Falls
55
Lynn Camp Prong
56
Rich Mountain Loop
57
Spence Field
59
Abrams Falls
60

Albright Grove
16
GatlinburgMt LeConte
21
Ramsey Cascades
22
Porters Creek Trail and Fern Branch Falls
23
Gatlinburg Trail
24
Sugarlands Valley Trail
25
Cataract Falls
26
Jakes Creek Falls
28
Little River and Cucumber Gap
29
Huskey Branch Falls
30
Little Greenbrier School and Walker Sisters House
31
Rainbow Falls
34
Grotto Falls and Brushy Mountain
35
Baskins Creek Falls
37
Chimney Tops
40
Alum Cave to Mt LeConte
42
Charlies Bunion and the Jumpoff
45
Gregory Bald
62
Look Rock Tower
65
CherokeeDeep Creek
67
Kephart Prong
69
Smokemont Loop
70
Oconaluftee Cherokee
72
Flat Creek
73
Mingo Falls
74
Juney Whank Falls
75
Indian Creek Falls
76
Twentymile Creek Cascade
79
Shuckstack Fire Tower
80
Appendices
83
Resources
99
Mileage Chart
105
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Hal Hubbs, Charles Maynard, and David Morris have hiked together and with their families for many years. The three friends formed Panther Press, which originally published Waterfalls and Cascades of the Great Smoky Mountains, along with many other titles on natural history, particularly in the Smokies. Hal, Charles, and David have worked as volunteers in the Smokies and have hiked in many national parks throughout the country. But as long time East Tennessee residents, they especially want families to enjoy the trails of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  


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