Go Out and Meet God: A Commentary on the Book of Exodus (Google eBook)

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1998 - Religion - 146 pages
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The book of Exodus is often seen only as ancient history, largely irrelevant to most of the modern Western world. In this new commentary Godfrey Ashby writes specifically to show how this Old Testament book is of continuing significance to readers today. Ashby discusses the crucial importance of the events described in Exodus and their meaning for the Old Testament gospel, and explains why the Exodus event is central to the gospel of Jesus Christ and to the faith of believers in our own age. He also explores the relevance of Exodus for the liberation struggle now taking place throughout the third world.
  

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Excellent commentary

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
1
Exodus 11225
5
Exodus 3161
18
Exodus 6227
32
Exodus 6281110
38
Exodus 1211316
52
Exodus 13171521
62
Exodus 15221827
71
Exodus 1912021
80
Exodus 20222319
98
Exodus 23202418
114
Exodus 2513118
119
Exodus 3213435
129
Exodus 3514038
140
Selected Bibliography
145
Copyright

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Page vii - EDITORS' PREFACE The Old Testament alive in the Church: this is the goal of the International Theological Commentary. Arising out of changing, unsettled times, this Scripture speaks with an authentic voice to our own troubled world. It witnesses to God's ongoing purpose and to his caring presence in the universe without ignoring those experiences of life that cause one to question his existence and love. This commentary series is written by front-rank scholars who treasure the life of faith.
Page ix - God, the authors of the Old Testament knew what life is like on the edge of existence. They addressed themselves to everyday people who often faced more than everyday problems. Refusing to limit God to the "spiritual," they portrayed him as one who heard and knew the cries of people in pain (see Exod.
Page viii - Scriptures, the biblical interpreter must take care lest he "christianize" these Scriptures. Authors writing in this commentary will, no doubt, hold varied views concerning how the Old Testament relates to the New. No attempt has been made to dictate one viewpoint in this matter. With the whole Church, we are convinced that the relationship between the two Testaments is real and substantial. But we recognize also the diversity of opinions among Christian scholars when they attempt to articulate fully...
Page vii - Commentary are Christians persons who affirm the witness of the New Testament concerning Jesus Christ. For Christians, the Bible is one scripture containing the Old and New Testaments. For this reason, a commentary on the Old Testament may not ignore the second part of the canon, namely, the New Testament. Since its beginning, the Church has recognized a special relationship between the two Testaments. But the precise character of this bond has been difficult to define. The diversity of views...
Page ix - By the end of this century, Christians in these areas will outnumber those who live in the West. In our age, especially, a commentary on the Bible must transcend the parochialism of Western civilization and be sensitive to issues that are the special problems of persons who live outside of the "Christian...
Page vii - God's existence and love. This commentary series is written by front-rank scholars who treasure the life of faith. Addressed to ministers and Christian educators, the International Theological Commentary moves beyond the usual critical-historical approach to the Bible and offers a theological interpretation of the Hebrew text. Thus, engaging larger textual units of the biblical writings, the authors of these volumes assist the reader in the appreciation of the theology underlying the text as well...
Page ix - On the other hand, Christians hold that the Old Testament finds its fulfillment in the New Testament. The Hebrew Bible, therefore, belongs to both the Church and the Synagogue. Recent studies have demonstrated how profoundly early Christianity reflects a Jewish character. This fact is not surprising because the Christian movement arose out of the context of firstcentury Judaism. Further, Jesus himself was Jewish, as were the first Christians. It is to be expected, therefore, that Jewish and Christian...
Page vii - ... to ministers and Christian educators, the International Theological Commentary moves beyond the usual criticalhistorical approach to the Bible and offers a theological interpretation of the Hebrew text. The authors of these volumes, therefore, engaging larger textual units of the biblical writings, assist the reader in the appreciation of the theology underlying the text as well as its place in the thought of the Hebrew Scriptures. But more, since the Bible is the book of the believing community,...
Page vii - This commentary series is written by front rank scholars who treasure the life of faith. Addressed to ministers and Christian educators, the International Theological Commentary moves beyond the usual criticalhistorical approach to the Bible and offers a theological interpretation of the Hebrew text. The authors of these volumes, therefore, engaging larger textual units of the biblical writings, assist the reader in the appreciation of the theology underlying the text as well as its place in the...

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About the author (1998)

Godfrey Ashby is retired as assistant bishop (Anglican) of George, South Africa.

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