First lines of physiology: designed for the use of students of medicine (Google eBook)

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Marsh, Capen & Lyon, 1835 - Medical - 520 pages
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Page 234 - After passing the oesophageal ring, it moves from right to left, along the small arch ; thence through the large curvature, from left to right. The bolus, as it enters the cardia, turns to the left, passes the aperture, descends into the splenic extremity, and follows the great curvature towards the pyloric end. It then returns, in the course of the smaller curvature, and makes its appearance again at the aperture in its descent into the great curvature, to perform similar revolutions.
Page 495 - In one of them, a watch inclosed in a case was handed to her, and she was requested to tell what o'clock it was by it ; upon which, after examining both sides of the watch, she opened the case, and then answered the question. She also read, without hesitation, the name of a gentleman, written in characters so fine, that no one else could distinguish it at the usual distance from the eye. In another paroxysm, the lights were removed from her room, and the windows so secured that no object was discernible,...
Page 496 - ... without hesitation, the name of a gentleman, written in characters so fine that no one else could distinguish it at the usual distance from the eye. In another paroxysm, the lights were removed from her room, and the windows so secured that no object was discernible, and two books were presented to her, when she immediately told the titles of both, though one of them was a book which she had never before seen.
Page 513 - ... accidental circumstances ; so that, from the fact, that, in many cases, this agent has failed to manifest itself, we ought not to conclude that it never exists. We are so far from being acquainted with all the agents in nature, and their different modes of action, that it would be unphilosophical, to deny the existence of phenomena, merely because, in the present state of our knowledge, they are inexplicable.
Page 404 - When an object is seen we enjoy too senses; there is ah impression upon the retina ; but we receive also the idea of position or relation, which it is not the office of the retina to give.
Page 327 - They are composed of both mineral and animal substances, united in the proportion of two parts of the former to one of the latter ; and we may separate each of these substances from the other for examination.
Page 487 - General Pichegru informed Sir G-ilbert Blane that, in the course of his active campaigns, he had for a whole year not more than one hour of sleep in the twenty-four hours. Frederick of Prussia and Napoleon, as a general thing, only devoted three or four hours to sleep.
Page 511 - A stranger who visited him, once slipped a piece of gold of the size of a kreutzer into his hand, without Caspar's being able to see it ; he said immediately that he felt gold in his hand. At a time when Caspar was absent, Professor Daumer placed a gold ring, a steel and brass compass, and a silver drawing pen, under some paper, so that it was impossible for him to see what was concealed under it. Daumer directed him to move his finger over the paper without touching it ; he did so, and by the difference...
Page 319 - We may imagine," he observes, " that, at the subdivision of a minute artery, a nervous filament pierces it on one side, and affords a pole positively electrical, and another opposite filament, a negative pole...
Page 505 - The operation lasted from ten to twelve minutes. During all this time, the patient continued to converse quietly with the operator, and did not exhibit the slightest sign of sensibility. There was no motion of the limbs or of the features, no change in the respiration nor in the voice, no emotion even in the pulse. The patient continued in the same state of automatic indifference and impassibility, in which she was some minutes before the operation.

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