The Jungle

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Spark Publishing Group, 2002 - Study Aids - 80 pages
1 Review
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AlexTheHunn - LibraryThing

As an instructor who uses The Jungle as an assigned text, this book is useful so I can keep up with what not to ask students on exams or identify specific phrases from the study guide itself. Over all, this is a decent guide and explanation of Sinclair's book. Read full review

Contents

CONTEXT
1
CHARACTER LIST
7
THEMES MOTIFS SYMBOLS
15
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Upton Sinclair, a lifelong vigorous socialist, first became well known with a powerful muckraking novel, The Jungle, in 1906. Refused by five publishers and finally published by Sinclair himself, it became an immediate bestseller, and inspired a government investigation of the Chicago stockyards, which led to much reform. In 1967 he was invited by President Lyndon Johnson to "witness the signing of the Wholesome Meat Act, which will gradually plug loopholes left by the first Federal meat inspection law" (N.Y. Times), a law Sinclair had helped to bring about. Newspapers, colleges, schools, churches, and industries have all been the subject of a Sinclair attack, analyzing and exposing their evils. Sinclair was not really a novelist, but a fearless and indefatigable journalist-crusader. All his early books are propaganda for his social reforms. When regular publishers boycotted his work, he published himself, usually at a financial loss. His 80 or so books have been translated into 47 languages, and his sales abroad, especially in the former Soviet Union, have been enormous.

Bibliographic information