The Attic Nights of Aulus Gellius, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, 1795 - Civilization, Greco-Roman
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Page 43 - Anon they move In perfect phalanx to the Dorian mood Of flutes and soft recorders...
Page 325 - While from the bounded level of our mind Short views we take, nor see the lengths behind ; But, more...
Page 143 - The Pleiads, Hyads, with the northern team; And great Orion's more refulgent beam; To which, around the axle of the sky, The Bear, revolving, points his golden eye, Still shines exalted on th' ethereal plain, Nor bathes his blazing forehead in the main.
Page 47 - To pigmy nations wounds and death they bring, And all the war descends upon the wing. But silent, breathing rage, resolv'd and skill'd By mutual aids to fix a doubtful field, Swift march the Greeks : the rapid dust around Darkening arises from the labour'd ground.
Page 225 - Even so late as the year 1471, when Louis XI. borrowed the works of Rasis, the Arabian physician, from the faculty of medicine in Paris, he not only deposited in pledge a considerable quantity of plate, but was obliged to procure a nobleman to join with him as surety in a deed, binding himself, under a great forfeiture, to restore it.
Page 178 - ... three thousand were reckoned in the baths of Diocletian. The walls of the lofty apartments were covered with curious mosaics, that imitated the art of the pencil in the elegance of design and the variety of colours. The Egyptian granite was beautifully...
Page 170 - The nature of the soil may indicate the countries most exposed to these formidable concussions, since they are caused by subterraneous fires, and such fires are kindled by the union and fermentation of iron and sulphur. But their times and effects appear to lie beyond the reach of human curiosity, and the philosopher will discreetly abstain from the prediction of earthquakes, till he has counted the drops of water that silently filtrate on the inflammable mineral, and measured the caverns which increase...
Page 119 - To truft in ev'ry thing, or doubt of all. Who thus define it, fay they more or lefs Than this, that Happinefs is Happinefs...
Page 160 - ... economy of private people, and to restrain their expense, either by sumptuary laws, or by prohibiting the importation of foreign luxuries. They are themselves always, and without any exception, the greatest spendthrifts in the society. Let them look well after their own expense, and they may safely trust private people with theirs. If their own extravagance does not ruin the state, that of their subjects never will.
Page 64 - And will ye pollute me among my people for handfuls of barley and for pieces of bread, to slay the souls that should not die, and to save the souls alive that should not live, by your lying to my people that hear your lies...

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