Alfred Moreland: The Would-be Traveller ... (Google eBook)

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Houlston - 190 pages
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Page 177 - The hunters go in pairs, the foremost man carrying in one hand the horns and part of the skin of the head of a deer and in the other a small bundle of twigs against which he from time to time rubs the horns, imitating the gestures peculiar to the animal. His comrade follows, treading exactly in his footsteps and holding the guns of both in a horizontal position so that the muzzles project under the arms of...
Page 134 - ... while on the sides and part of the tail the spots unite in ten ranges of distinct roses, surrounding a central area of a somewhat deeper colour than the general ground. In the Panther there are only six or seven ranges of these roses.
Page 138 - One of the artillery-men wanted to go in to the tiger, but we would not suffer it. At last the beast sprang ; this man received him on his bayonet, which he thrust, apparently, down his throat, firing his piece at the same moment. The bayonet broke off short, leaving less than three inches on the musket, the rest remained in the animal, but was invisible to us : the shot probably went through his cheek, for it certainly did not seriously injure...
Page 139 - ... went through his cheek, for it certainly did not seriously injure him, as he instantly rose upon his legs, with a loud roar, and placed his paws upon the soldier's breast. At this moment, the animal appeared to me...
Page 29 - ... scanty food with the prowling wolves of those inclement regions. On one occasion, when they had captured a moose-deer and had buried a part of the body, the wolves absolutely dug it out from their very feet, and devoured it, while the weary men were sleeping. On another occasion, when the travellers had killed a deer, they saw, by the flashes of the Aurora Borealis, eight wolves waiting around for their share of the prey ; and the intense howling of the ferocious animals, and the cracking of...
Page 39 - This species of animal has long abounded in the above countries, while the Asiatic lion, on the contrary, has only been known within a few years. The average height of the tiger is about three feet, and the length nearly six feet. The species, however, varies considerably in size, and individuals have often been found much taller and longer than the lion. The peculiar markings of the tiger's skin, are well known. On a ground of yellow, of various shades in different specimens, there is a series of...
Page 39 - ... two tiger cubs were brought to him while stationed in the Ramghur district in India. They had been found, with two others, by some country people, during the absence of the mother. Being put in a stable, they made a loud noise for several nights, till at length the tigress arrived to their rescue, and replied to them by the most fearful bowlings. The cubs were at last let loose, in apprehension that their mother would break in ; and in the morning it was found that she had carried them off to...
Page 170 - ... with the other portions of mankind. The inhabitants of Lapland are divided into two classes ; those who live upon the shore and subsist by fishing, and those who wander through the summer and winter, with no shelter but their tents, and no provision but their rein-deer. In summer, the wandering; or mountain Laplander is compelled to undertake the most arduous journeys to the Coast, for the preservation of his deer. Mr. De Broke in his
Page 26 - Wolves in the northern regions sometimes measure six feet from the nose to the tip of the tail. The...
Page 138 - The tiger (I must continue to call him so) had taken refuge in a hut, the roof of which, like those of Ceylon huts in general, spread to the ground like an umbrella ; the only aperture into it was a small door, about four feet high. The collector wanted to get the tiger out at once. I begged to wait for my gun; but no the fowling-piece (loaded with ball of course) and the two hog-spears were quite enough.

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