The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History

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Thames & Hudson, 1999 - Cities and towns - 352 pages
5 Reviews
Published to overwhelming critical acclaim, this classic study of cities explains how and why cities - among the most enduring and remarkable of all human artifacts - took the shape they did. Professor Kostof focuses on a number of themes - organic patterns, the grid, the city as diagram, the grand manner, and the skyline - and interprets the hidden order of urban patterns. Photographs, historical views and specially commissioned drawings vividly depict a global mosaic of city building - the shaping of medieval Siena; the creation of New Delhi as the crown of the Raj, the remodeling of Moscow as the self-styled capital of world socialism and the transformation of the skyline as religious and civic symbols yield to the towers of corporate business. This is an enthralling book, of vital interest to architects, planners and social historians.

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Review: The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History

User Review  - John Andrews - Goodreads

Better illustrations than Mumford's book but not nearly as interesting to read Read full review

Review: The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History

User Review  - Blair - Goodreads

Wow. If you are into the philosophy of urban space and/or planning, this is your shit. Wow. Kostof's appreciation for the allocation of space and the cultural repercussions therein are well worth wading through the reference-like presentation. A great take on urban anthropology. Read full review

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