The life of John Moore, M.D.: with critical observations on his works (Google eBook)

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Printed for Stirling and Slade, 1820 - 60 pages
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Page xxxi - Sketches of Life, Characters, and Manners in various Countries ; including the Memoirs of a French Lady of Quality,
Page lii - Vice, for vice is necessary to be shewn, should always disgust.} nor should the graces of gaiety, or the dignity of courage, be so united with it as to reconcile it to the mind. Wherever it appears, it should raise hatred by the malignity of its practices, and contempt by the meanness of its stratagems ; for while it is supported by either parts or spirit, it will be seldom heartily abhorred.
Page lii - In narratives, where historical veracity has no place* I cannot discover, why there should not be exhibited the most perfect idea of virtue ; of virtue not angelical, nor above probability, for what we cannot credit we shall never imitate ; but the highest and purest that humanity can reach...
Page lii - I cannot discover, why there should not be exhibited the most perfect idea of virtue ; of virtue not angelical, nor above probability, for what we cannot credit we shall never imitate ; but the highest and purest that humanity can reach, which, exercised in such trials as the various revolutions of things shall bring upon it, may, by conquering some calamities and enduring others, teach us what we may hope, and what we can perform.
Page xxxiii - With Memoir of his Life. To which is prefixed a view of the Commencement and Progress of Romance, by JOHN MOORE, MD A New edition.
Page ix - Through the long annals of two princely lines ; And all that liberal nature could impart, To charm the eye, or captivate the heart ; With every genuine mark that could presage Intrinsic greatness in maturer age...
Page lii - Wherever it appears, it should raise hatred by the malignity of its practices, and contempt by the meanness of its stratagems : for while it is supported by either parts or spirit, it will be seldom heartily abhorred. The Roman tyrant was content to be hated, if he was but feared ; and there are thousands of the readers of romances willing to be thought wicked, if they may be allowed to be wits. It is therefore to be steadily inculcated, that virtue is the highest proof of understanding, and the...
Page xxvii - A Journal, during a Residence in France, from the beginning of August to the middle of December, 1792.
Page xviii - I receive with reverence: only I am sorry they mostly came too late: a peccant passage or two that I would certainly have altered, were gone to the press. The hope to be admired for ages is, in by far the greater part of those even who are authors of repute, an unsubstantial dream. For my part, my first ambition was, and still my strongest wish is, to please my compeers, the inmates of the hamlet, while ever-changing language and manners shall allow me to be relished and understood.
Page xxvi - September; events which led to the overthrow of the monarchy, and the death of the unfortunate king.

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