Book of Dreams and Ghosts 1897

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Kessinger Publishing, Aug 1, 2003 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 324 pages
8 Reviews
The chief purpose of this book is, if fortune helps, to entertain people interested in the kind of narratives here collected. For the sake of orderly arrangement, the stories are classed in different grades, as they advance from the normal & familiar to the undeniably startling. At the same time an account of the current theories of apparitions is offered, in language as free from technicalities as possible. According to modern opinion every ghost is a hallucination, a false perception, the perception of something which is not present. Contents: Dreams; Visions; Crystal Visions; Hallucinations; Wraiths; Ghosts.

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Review: Eric Brighteyes

User Review  - RL Robinson - Goodreads

Because the Icelandic saga represents one of the first instances of prose in Western literature, it provides us with a rich world that is now completely gone. We still know very little about the ... Read full review

Review: Eric Brighteyes

User Review  - Kashfia Nehrin - Goodreads

I was just become so disturbed after reading this book, I still can not believe that this was written by Haggard who was, is and always will be my hero. It was so annoying and not that strong enough ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Andrew Lang's activities extended far beyond folklore. He was a historian, poet, journalist, translator, and anthropologist, in connection with his work on literary texts. Lang was born at Selkirk in Scotland and was educated at Edinburgh Academy, St. Andrews University, and Balliol College, Oxford University, becoming a fellow at Merton College. His poetry includes Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), Ballades in Blue China (1880--81), and Grass of Parnassus (1888--92). His anthropology and his defense of the value of folklore as the basis of religion---his most influential work---is expressed in Custom and Myth (1884), Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887), and The Making of Religion (1898). He also translated Homer and critiqued James G. Frazer's views of mythology as expressed in The Golden Bough. He was considered a good historian, with a readable narrative style and knowledge of the original sources (e.g., History of Scotland [1900--7], James VI and the Gowrie Mystery [1902], and Sir George Mackenzie [1909]). In addition, he wrote some novels, not well thought of today; however, his critiques of contemporary novels are still highly regarded. Lang's popularity was established with his collections of "Fairy" books, which were always titled with a color, such as The Blue Fairy Book. These books preserved and handed down many of the better-known folk tales from the time; however, his use of the term "fairy" to cover all kinds of folk tales continues to plague scholars, who generally distinguish between the terms "fairy" and "folk," judging fairy tales to be more of a fanciful creation and less grounded in cultural experiences, customs, and beliefs.

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