Plays and Poems (Google eBook)

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G. Routledge, 1887 - 286 pages
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Page 285 - His golden locks time hath to silver turned; O time too swift, O swiftness never ceasing ! His youth 'gainst time and age hath ever spurned, But spurned in vain; youth waneth by increasing: Beauty, strength, youth are flowers but fading seen; Duty, faith, love are roots, and ever green. His helmet now shall make a hive for bees; And, lovers...
Page 26 - My love is fair, my love is gay, \ As fresh as bin the flowers in May, And of my love my roundelay, My merry merry merry roundelay, Concludes with Cupid's curse, They that do change old love for new, Pray gods they change for worse ! BOTH.
Page 285 - And lovers' sonnets turned to holy psalms, A man-at-arms must now serve on his knees, And feed on prayers, which are Age his alms: But though from court to cottage he depart, His Saint is sure of his unspotted heart. And when he saddest sits in homely cell, He'll teach his swains this carol for a song, "Blest be the hearts that wish my sovereign well, Curst be the souls that think her any wrong.
Page 85 - Now comes my Lover tripping like the Roe, And brings my longings tangled in her hair. To joy her love I'll build a kingly bower. Seated in hearing of a hundred streams, That, for their homage to her sovereign joys, Shall, as the serpents fold into their nests, In oblique turnings wind the nimble waves About the circles of her curious walks, And with their murmur summon easeful sleep To lay his golden sceptre on her brows.
Page 177 - Now sit thee here, and tell a heavy tale, Sad in thy mood, and sober in thy cheer ; Here sit thee now, and to thyself relate The hard mishap of thy most wretched state. In Thessaly I...
Page 25 - My love is fair, my love is gay, As fresh as bin the flowers in May, And of my love my roundelay, My merry, merry, merry roundelay, Concludes with Cupid's curse, They that do change old love for new, Pray gods they change for worse ! Ambo simul.
Page 180 - Lamp. By my other wife I had a daughter so hardfavoured, so foul, and ill-faced, that I think a grove full of golden trees, and the leaves of rubies and diamonds, would not be a dowry answerable to her deformity. Erest. Well, neighbour, now you have spoke, hear me speak : send them to the well for the water of life ; there shall they find their fortunes unlocked for.
Page 208 - Gently dip, but not too deep, . For fear thou make the golden beard to weep. Fair maid, white and red, Comb me smooth, and stroke my head, And every hair a sheaf shall be, And every sheaf a golden tree.
Page 26 - Fair and fair and twice so fair, As fair as any may be: Thy love is fair for thee alone, And for no other lady.
Page 82 - What tunes, what words, what looks, what wonders pierce My soul, incensed with a sudden fire ! What tree, what shade, what spring, what paradise, Enjoys the beauty of so fair a dame ! Fair Eva, plac'd in perfect happiness, Lending her praise-notes to the liberal heavens, Struck with the accents of Arch-angels' tunes, Wrought not more pleasure to her husband's thoughts, Than this fair woman's words and notes to mine.

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