Architects' people

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Oxford University Press, Aug 17, 1989 - Architecture - 291 pages
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In the past there has been little reason to examine "architects' people"--the people who are imagined to occupy the buildings designed and executed by architects. Societies have historically provided clear rituals and rules for the built environment. Recently, however, the changing conditions of architectural conception and execution have resulted in a need for inventive, socially alert planning. This study, the first to survey the topic, presents architects' ideas about their "people." Contributors such as Robert Gutman and Kent Bloomer, provide fourteen diverse essays that look at individual architects--among them Vitruvius. Wright, Esherick, and Eisenman--and their spoken and written images of social life, their design solutions, the nature and origins of architects' people, and architecturally related policy, politics, and movements. An original treatment of an increasingly important topic, the book will be of interest to a wide range of architects, architectural historians, social scientists, educators, and students of design.

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Contents

Introduction
3
Ideals in Words
10
Was Man the Measure?
31
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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References to this book

Architectural Technology
Stephen Emmitt
No preview available - 2002
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About the author (1989)

Dana Cuff is Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a principal of the consulting firm Community Design Associates.

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