Electromagnetics

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Taylor & Francis, Feb 21, 2001 - Technology & Engineering - 560 pages
2 Reviews
Between a first undergraduate course in electromagnetism (EM) and the advanced graduate course lies a middle ground that is essential to engineering students yet virtually ignored by most curricula. It is the transition from the basic, more superficial treatments to the sharply focused graduate studies that solidifies students' understanding of EM fundamentals before they move on to a specialized area of research. And it is here that academia-and practitioners still uneasy about the fundamentals-have lacked the appropriate "intermediate" text.

Electromagnetics provides that transition. Emphasizing concepts over problem-solving techniques, it focuses on the topics most important to EM research and those most troublesome to beginning graduate students. In Part I, the authors cover the required mathematics background and introduce the primary physical principles. From a well-posed postulate, Part II builds a complete description of the EM field in free space, and Part III completes the study by investigating the behavior of the EM field in a variety of materials. Stressing both a physical understanding and a detailed mathematical description of each topic, this text provides an account of EM theory that is in-depth, lucid, and accessible.

Highly engaging prose, clear, concise explanations, and numerous examples relating concepts to modern engineering applications create a comfortable atmosphere that enhances the reader's grasp of the material. Electromagnetics thus builds a foundation that allows readers to proceed with confidence to advanced EM studies, research, and applications.

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