Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

Front Cover
Spokesman Books, 2007 - Mathematics - 208 pages
18 Reviews
Bertrand Russell is probably the most important philosopher of mathematics in the 20th century. He brought together his formidable knowledge of the subject and skills as a gifted communicator to provide a classic introduction to the philosophy of mathematics.
  

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Review: Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

User Review  - mm - Goodreads

I was under the impression that this would be light reading... It is presented clearly, but Russell primarily uses analogy to describe some very ambitious ideas that could benefit from a diagram or two. This didn't scare me off. I'll have to take a look at Principia Mathematica. Read full review

Review: Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

User Review  - Goodreads

I was under the impression that this would be light reading... It is presented clearly, but Russell primarily uses analogy to describe some very ambitious ideas that could benefit from a diagram or two. This didn't scare me off. I'll have to take a look at Principia Mathematica. Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
11
V
20
VI
29
VII
42
VIII
52
IX
63
X
77
XIII
107
XIV
117
XV
131
XVI
144
XVII
155
XVIII
167
XIX
181
XX
194

XI
89
XII
97

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About the author (2007)

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic. He was best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. Together with G.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the main founders of modern analytic philosophy. Together with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of a long career, Russell also made contributions to a broad range of subjects, including the history of ideas, ethics, political and educational theory, and religious studies. General readers have benefited from his many popular writings on a wide variety of topics. After a life marked by controversy--including dismissals from both Trinity College, Cambridge, and City College, New York--Russell was awarded the Order of Merit in 1949 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Noted also for his many spirited anti-nuclear protests and for his campaign against western involvement in the Vietnam War, Russell remained a prominent public figure until his death at the age of 97.

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