The new household receipt book: containing maxims, directions, and specifics for promoting health, comfort, and improvement in the homes of the people : compiled from the best authorities, with many receipts never before collected (Google eBook)

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H. Long, 1853 - House & Home - 394 pages
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Page vi - These will probably continue to be used in practice. For Wine and Spirits, there are, the Anker, Runlet, Tierce, Hogshead, Puncheon, Pipe, Butt, and Tun ; but these may be considered rather as the names of the casks in which such commodities are imported, than as expressing any definite number of gallons. It is the practice to gauge all such vessels, and to charge them according to their actual content. Flour is sold nominally by measure, but actually by weight, reckoned at 71b.
Page 19 - Take two ounces of tripoli powdered, put it into an earthen pot, with just enough water to cover it ; then take a piece of white flannel, lay it over a piece of cork or rubber, and proceed to polish the varnish, always wetting it with the tripoli and water. It will be known when the process is finished by wiping a part of the work with a sponge, and observing whether there is a fair even gloss.
Page 102 - Let a sponge, three or four inches in diameter, be moistened with pure water, and in that state be suspended by a string or wire, exactly over the flame of the lamp, at the distance of a few inches ; this substance will absorb all the smoke emitted during the evening, or night, after which it should be rinsed in warm water, by which means it will be again rendered fit for use.
Page 377 - ... are observed to be growing dry. In painting with this composition the colours blend without difficulty when wet, and even when dry the tints may easily be united by means of a brush and a very small quantity of fair water.
Page 176 - Indian lake, which may be made by infusing the lake some days in spirits of wine, and then pouring off the tincture from the dregs. It may be stained red by red ink. It may also be stained of a scarlet hue by the tincture of dragon's-blood in spirits of wine, but this will not be bright.
Page 19 - Take 2 oz. powdered tri.poli, put it in an earthen pot, with water to cover it ; then take a piece of white flannel, lay it over a . piece of cork or rubber, and proceed to polish the varnish, always wetting it with the tripoli and water. It will be known when the process is finished by wiping a part of the work with a sponge, and observing whether there is a fair even gloss. When this is the case, take a bit of mutton suet and line flour, and clean the work.
Page 191 - To eight gallons of clear rain water, add three quarts of molasses; turn the mixture into a clean tight cask, shake it well two or three times, and add three spoonfuls of good yeast, or...
Page 63 - Put the gloves on your hands and wash them, as if you were washing your hands, in some spirits of turpentine, until quite clean; then hang them up in a warm place or where there is a current of air, and all smell of the turpentine will be removed.
Page 51 - Have ready a little new milk in one saucer, and a piece of brown soap in another, and a clean cloth or towel, folded three or four times. On the cloth, spread out the glove smooth and neat. Take a...
Page 39 - ... a little water on the mixture. Use this compost at the back part of your fire. It will burn brightly and pleasantly; only a little dust will remain unconsumed ; and thus the trouble of sifting will be saved besides. HINT SEVENTH. Another excellent suggestion by the same American authoress : Mix one bushel of small coal, or saw-dust, or both, with two bushels of sand, and one bushel and a half of clay. Take water, and make the mixture into balls, and pile them up in a dry place till they...

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