Mountain Environments: An Examination of the Physical Geography of Mountains

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MIT Press, 1990 - Science - 317 pages
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Using examples chosen from a variety of geographical settings and scales, A. J. Gerrard presents a novel approach to the study of mountain environments. He provides a framework in which mountains as special environments can be studied and shows how, no matter what their location or origin all mountain regions share common characteristics and undergo similar shaping processes.

Gerrard's integrated approach combines ecological, climatological, hydrological, volcanic, and environmental management concerns in a systematic treatment of mountain geomorphology. He begins by examining the special nature of mountains, including a new classification of mountain types. He discusses mountain ecosystems, stressing the interaction between biota, soil, climate, relief, and geology, examines the high-energy systems of weathering and mass movement, and analyzes the role of rivers and hydrology and the processes of slope evolution. Two chapters are devoted to the particular characteristics of glaciation and vulcanism in mountain formation. The book concludes with a discussion of the special problems that human use of mountain regions create, including engineering, natural hazards, soil erosion, and the concept of integrated development.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Mountain geoecology
36
Weathering and mass movement
67
Mountain hydrology and river processes
93
Slope form and evolution
132
Glaciation of mountains
162
Volcanoes as mountains
192
applied physical geography
224
Integration of spatial and temporal mountain systems
248
Bibliography
266
Index
310
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About the author (1990)

University of Birmingham

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