The British Cicero: or, A selection of the most admired speeches in the English language (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Thomas Browne (LL.D.)
Printed for and published by Birch and Small, 1810 - Language Arts & Disciplines
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Page 468 - Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, that, on every such trial, the jury sworn to try the issue may give a general verdict of guilty or not guilty upon the whole matter, put in issue...
Page 1 - Of Law there can be no less acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world : all things in heaven and earth do her homage ; the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 272 - Scriptures themselves, might be distorted into libels ; by forsaking the general context, and hanging a meaning upon selected parts: thus, as in the text put by Algernon Sidney, " The " fool has said in his heart, There is no God...
Page 227 - Scotland a na-tion cast in the happy medium between the spiritless acquiescence of submissive poverty, and the sturdy credulity of pampered wealth ; cool and ardent ; adventurous and persevering ; winging her eagle flight against the blaze of every science, with an eye that never winks, and a wing that never tires ; crowned as she is with the spoils of every art.
Page 291 - I have heard them in my youth from a naked savage, in the indignant character of a prince surrounded by his subjects, addressing the governor of a British colony, holding a bundle of sticks in his hand, as the notes of his unlettered eloquence.
Page 89 - If the meaning of these words, finding against the direction of the court in matter of law, be, that if the judge, having heard the' evidence given in court, (for he knows no other) shall tell the jury upon this evidence.
Page 294 - ... alloys which belong to them, or live without them. Genius breaks from the fetters of criticism, but its wanderings are sanctioned by its majesty and wisdom when it advances in its path ; subject it to the critic, and you tame it into dulness.
Page 343 - These points are wont to be approached with a kind of awe ; they are represented to the mind as principles of the constitution settled by our ancestors, and, being settled, to be no more committed to innovation or debate ; as foundations never to be stirred, as the terms and conditions of the social compact, to which every citizen of the state has engaged his fidelity, by virtue of a promise which he cannot now recall. Such reasons have no place in our system...
Page 133 - Gentlemen, the real prosecutor is the master of the greatest empire the civilized world ever saw. The defendant is a defenceless proscribed exile. He is a French royalist, who fled from his country in the autumn of 1792, at the period of that memorable and awful emigration, when all the proprietors...
Page 226 - ... bears him down, or drives him off, and he appears no more. In the other case, how does the work of sedition go forward ? Night after night the muffled rebel steals forth in the dark, and casts another and another brand upon the pile, to which, when the hour of fatal maturity shall arrive, he will apply the flame.