Private Lives

Front Cover
Samuel French, Inc., 1975 - Drama - 58 pages
15 Reviews
Full Length, Comedy

Characters: 2 males, 3 females

Set Requirements: 2 interiors

Revived in 2002 by the Royal National Theatre in a production that sparkled on Broadway, Private Lives is one of the most sophisticated, entertaining plays ever written. Elyot and Amanda, once married and now honeymooning with new spouses at the same hotel, meet by chance, reignite the old spark and impulsively elope. After days of being reunited, they again find their fiery romance alternating between passions of love and anger. Their aggrieved spouses appear and a roundelay of affiliations ensues as the women first stick together, then apart, and new partnerships are formed. A uniquely humorous play boasting numerous successful Broadway runs boasting such as stars Coward himself, Laurence Olivier, Tallulah Bankhead, Gertrude Lawrence, Tammy Grimes, Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor.

"Gorgeous, dazzling, fantastically funny."-The New York Times

"A gleaming and gleeful comedy."-New York Post

  

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Review: Private Lives

User Review  - Heather - Goodreads

Marital spats, personal digs, fiery tempers, catty dialogue, intelligent writing, and British. What more could you want? Read full review

Review: Private Lives

User Review  - Robert Marini - Goodreads

Reminded me of Oscar Wilde's best plays. Fun, decedent--I look forward to seeing it performed. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
56
Section 2
57
Section 3
58
Section 4
60
Section 5
61
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

Noel Coward was born in 1899 in Teddington, Middlesex. He made his name as a playwright with The Vortex (1924), in which he also appeared. His numerous other successful plays included Fallen Angels (1925), Hay Fever (1925), Private Lives (1933), Design for Living (1933), and Blithe Spirit (1941). During the war he wrote screenplays such as Brief Encounter (1944) and This Happy Breed (1942). In the fifties he started a new career as a cabaret entertainer. He published volumes of verse and a novel, Pomp and Circumstance (1960), two volumes of autobiography, and four volumes of short stories: To Step Aside (1939), Star Quality (1951), Pretty Polly Barlow (1964), and Bon Voyage (l967). Coward was knighted in 1970 and died three years later in Jamaica.

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