Annual Register, Volume 14 (Google eBook)

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1803 - History
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Page 217 - The lowing herd ; the sheepfold's simple bell ; The pipe of early shepherd dim descried In the lone valley ; echoing far and wide The clamorous horn along the cliffs above ; The hollow murmur of the ocean-tide ; The hum of bees, and linnet's lay of love, And the full choir that wakes the universal grove.
Page 213 - O how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven...
Page 184 - Nous ne raisonnons guère en métaphysique que sur des probabilités; nous nageons tous dans une mer dont nous n'avons jamais vu le rivage. Malheur à ceux qui se battent en nageant ! Abordera qui pourra; mais celui qui me crie : Vous nagez en vain, il n'ya point de port, me décourage et m'ôte toutes mes forces.
Page 216 - With merriment, and song, and timbrels clear, A troop of dames from myrtle bowers advance ; The little warriors doff the targe and spear, And loud enlivening strains provoke the dance. They meet, they dart away, they wheel askance ; To right, to left, they thrid the flying maze ; Now bound aloft with vigorous spring, then glance Rapid along : with many-colour'd rays Of tapers, gems, and gold, the echoing forests blaze.
Page 157 - Apollo another; which makes so many different ideas of beauty. It is true, indeed, that these figures are each perfect in their kind, though of different characters and proportions; but still none of them is the representation of an individual, but of a class.
Page 212 - AH ! who can tell how hard it is to climb The steep where Fame's proud temple shines afar ; Ah ! who can tell how many a soul sublime Has felt the influence of malignant star, And waged with Fortune an eternal war ; Check'd by the scoff of Pride, by Envy's frown, And Poverty's unconquerable bar, In life's low vale remote has pined alone, Then dropt into the grave, unpitied and unknown...
Page 160 - If deceiving the eye were the only business of the art, there is no doubt, indeed, but the minute painter would be more apt to succeed: but it is not the eye, it is the mind, which the painter of genius desires to address...
Page 156 - This great ideal perfection and beauty are not to be sought in the heavens, but upon the earth. They are about us, and upon every side of us. But the power of discovering what is deformed in Nature, or in other words, what is particular and uncommon, can be acquired only by experience ; and the whole beauty and grandeur of the art consists, in my opinion, in being able to get above all singular forms, local customs, particularities, and details of every kind.
Page 157 - ... superior to any individual form of that class; yet the highest perfection of the human figure is not to be found in any one of them. It is not in the Hercules...
Page 214 - Th' exploit of strength, dexterity, or speed, To him nor vanity nor joy could bring : His heart, from cruel sport estranged, would bleed To work the woe of any living thing, By trap or net, by arrow or by sling ; These he detested ; those he...

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