Practice of architecture: Containing the five orders of architecture and an additional column and entablature (Google eBook)

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Pub. by the Author, 1833 - Architecture - 116 pages
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Page 93 - In the year 1795 I made the drawings and superintended the erection of a circular stair-case in the State House at Hartford, Connecticut ; which, I believe, was the first circular rail that was ever made in New England.
Page 50 - ... this one of the most beautiful and bold examples of this order. The elegant base of the column, the grand proportion of the entablature, the massy mouldings of the cornice, and the spacious surface of the frieze, well adapted for sculptured ornaments, and the architrave for its strength, as...
Page 108 - Ireadths : again, if a beam two inches deep and one inch broad, support a given weight, another beam of four inches deep and one inch broad, will support four times the weight ; hence, beams of equal breadths are to each other as the squares of their depths : again, if a beam of a given cross section one foot long, support a known weight, another beam of the same cross section, but two feet long, will support only half the known weight; hence, beams of equal dimensions are to each...
Page 23 - ... grave, after covering it with a tile to protect it from the weather. The basket was accidentally placed over the roots of an acanthus. The natural growth of the plant being impeded by the pressure upon it, the middle leaf and the cauliculi appeared in the spring around the bottom of the basket. The cauliculi, attaching themselves to the external surface, grew upwards, until their progress was arrested by the angles of the tile projecting over the basket, which caused them to incline forward and...
Page 108 - ... fracture.) If a beam 2 inches deep and one inch broad, support a given weight, another beam of the same depth, and double the breadth, will support double the weight: hence, beams of the same depth are to each other as their breadths: again, if a beam 2 inches deep, and 1 inch broad, support a given weight, another beam of...
Page iii - Benjamin speaks plainly about his anticipated audience: Those Carpenters in country villages who aspire to eminence in their business, having no Architect to consult, are under the necessity of studying the science thoroughly and without a master. To them, therefore, is this book peculiarly adapted; for it contains the principles of many expensive folios, condensed into a narrow space and applied to modern practice.
Page 26 - ... temples dedicated to Venus, to Flora, Proserpine, and the nymphs of fountains, because the flowers, foliage, and volutes with which it is adorned seemed well adapted to the delicacy and elegance of such deities. Being. the most splendid of all the orders, it is extremely proper for the decoration of palaces, public squares, or galleries and arcades surrounding them ; for churches dedicated to the Virgin Mary, or to other virgin saints, and on account of its rich, gay, and graceful appearance...
Page 36 - I have often inquired the reason of this, from very intelligent workmen, and have as often received for answer, that the Tuscan order is too massive and plain, the Doric too expensive, and the Ionic too rich, and that they are therefore under the necessity of composing a column and entablature which will conform to the views and purses of their employers.
Page 26 - Corinthian order," says Sir William Chambers, " is proper for all buildings where elegance, gaiety, and magnificence are required. The ancients employed it in temples dedicated to Venus, to Flora, Proserpine, and the nymphs of fountains, because the flowers, foliage, and volutes with which it is adorned seemed well adapted to the delicacy and elegance of such deities. Being. the most splendid of all the orders, it is extremely proper for the decoration of palaces, public squares, or galleries and...
Page 86 - Assembly ; and at the first session of the legislature after this constitution takes effect, the senators shall be divided by lot as equally as may be, into two classes ; the seats of the senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the...

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