Voyage to South America, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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T. and J. Allman, 1820 - Argentina
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Page xvii - Wha will be a traitor knave? Wha can fill a coward's grave? Wha sae base as be a slave? Let him turn and flee! Wha for Scotland's king and law Freedom's sword will strongly draw, Freeman stand or freeman fa', Let him follow me!
Page 32 - ... of particular leaders; these have been followed by events calculated to produce a still greater alienation ; and, although several attempts have been made to bring about a union, they have hitherto been unsuccessful. The provinces of the "Banda Oriental...
Page 22 - The newspapers are everywhere circulated, together with the manifestoes of the Government, which is obliged to court the approbation of public opinion on all measures of moment. It is not very unusual for the same countryman, who, a few years ago, never troubled himself about any thing beyond the narrow circle of his domestic concerns, to purchase a newspaper on coming to town, as a matter of course, and, if unable to read, to request the first one he meets to do him that favor. The country curates...
Page 14 - ... goods imported or articles exported. The impost furnishes the principal part of the revenue. A copy of their tariff, as at first established, was some time since transmitted, I believe, to the Department of State ; in this the duties were generally specific and high. I understand they have been lately reduced, as their exorbitancy had occasioned much smuggling. Voluntary contributions from those friendly to the Revolution, and forced loans from the Old Spaniards, hnve constituted another portion...
Page 37 - ... it would not be adopted, upon the ground that it was not so well calculated as a national government, to provide for the common defence, the great object now in view. The same general reason may be urged perhaps, for giving to the latter, should it be adopted, less of a republican character than probably would have been given to it, in more quiet and peaceful times. There is danger too, as the power of forming and adopting the constitution is placed in the hands...
Page 17 - Posadas, when he succeeded to the Government, treated him as a deserter from their service. By a proclamation, he offered a reward for his apprehension, and set a price upon his head an act which General Artigas never forgot or forgave.
Page 173 - Catherine's and the continent; there is every variety to give beauty to the scene; handsome villages and houses built around; shores which gradually ascend in mountains, covered to their summits with trees which remain in constant verdure; a climate always temperate and healthy; small islands scattered here and there, equally covered with verdure; the soil extremely productive ; all combine to render it in appearance the most delightful country in the world/' We had at length reached the yawning...
Page 24 - They complain that every possible impediment was thrown in the way of education previous to the revolution; that, so far from fostering public institutions for this purpose, several schools were actually prohibited in the capital, and the young men were not without restraint permitted to go abroad for their education. There was a college at Cordova, at which those destined for the bar or the priesthood completed their studies upon the ancient monkish principles. Another, called San Carlos (now the...
Page 25 - ... and an annual appropriation by the Government, and contains works on all subjects and in all the languages of the polished nations of Europe. A very valuable addition has been lately made of several thousand volumes, brought to Buenos Ayres by M. Bonpland, the companion of the celebrated Humboldt. Besides the University of Cordova, at which there are about one hundred and fifty students, there are public schools in all the principal towns, supported by their respective corporations.
Page 34 - ... been ready to meet the difficulties of so great an undertaking. This circumstance connected with their local situation, greater resources, and more general information, and perhaps the fact of their having been the first to get power into their hands, have had the effect to give them a controlling influence over the revolutionary government, which has not failed to excite, in some degree, the jealousy of the other provinces, and amongst themselves a feeling of superiority little calculated to...

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