A Memoir of Edward Askew Sothern (Google eBook)

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R. Bentley and son, 1890 - 345 pages
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Page 319 - To the surprise of every one, himself included, these antics, intended by him to injure the character, were received by the audience with delight. He was a shrewd man as well as an effective actor, and he saw at a glance that accident had revealed to him a golden opportunity. He took advantage of it, and with cautious steps increased his speed, feeling the ground well under him as he proceeded. Before the first month was over he stood side by side with any other character in the play ; and at the...
Page 59 - Paris was that in which occurred the performance of Dundreary. You are, perhaps, aware that at the subsidy theatres in France, no fire, not even a lighted match, is permitted on the stage. You will also recall the fact that in one part of the play, Asa Trenchard has to burn a will. In order to comply with the law and at the same time get rid of this document, I was compelled to tear the will instead of applying the match in the usual way. The result was that the part was not at all a success, much...
Page 318 - ... have supposed, better judges. He gave me the play to read. While it possessed but little literary merit, there was a fresh, breezy atmosphere about the characters and the story that attracted me very much. I saw, too, the chance of making a strong character of the leading part, and so I was quite selfish enough to recommend the play for production. The reading took place in the greenroom, at which the ladies and gentlemen of the company were assembled, and many furtive glances were cast at Mr....
Page 43 - Then I suppose that's the reason I never got it ; but who could have got it ? The only fella that could have got that letter is some fella without a name. And how on earth could he get it ? The postman couldn't go about asking every fella he met if he'd got no name. " Sam's an ass. ' I find out now ' (I wonder what he's found out now) ' that I was changed at my birth.
Page 44 - Sam's mother, and that's {the thumb) Sam's nurse. Sam's nurse is only half the size of his mother. Well, that's my mother (points to second finger on left hand He finds he can't get that finger to stand up like the rest the thumb and forefinger as he closes the third and little finger). I can't get my mother to stand up. Well...
Page 286 - Sothern began by burning his arm, and passing it through the gas-jet very slowly, twice stopping the motion and holding it still in the flames. He then picked up a poker with a sort of hook on the end, and proceeded to fish a small coil of wire from the grate. The wire came out fairly white with heat. Mr. Sothern took the coil in his hands and coolly proceeded to wrap it round his left leg to the knee. Having done so, he stood on the table in the centre of the circle and requested the committee to...
Page 113 - IT is not a matter of wonder that Sothern is spoken of as ' a prince of good fellows.' He is magnetic in manner, humorous in speech, rich in reminiscence, responsive, and sympathetic, a good listener, an equally good talker, and always sparkling like a newly-opened bottle of champagne. With such a battery of social forces, added to ability of a high order in the representation of the peculiar characters with which his name is now identified on both sides the Atlantic, professional success has been...
Page 253 - Young man, I know thy secret thou lovest above thy station: if thou hast wit, courage, and discretion, I can secure to thee the realization of thy most sanguine hopes; and the sole condition I ask in return is, that thou shalt be steadfast to thine own ends. I shall demand from thee a solemn oath to marry. her whom thou lovest; to bear her to thine home on thy wedding night. I am serious if thou wouldst learn more, lose not a moment, but follow...
Page 285 - I suppose you wish to give us the firetest," remarked one of the company. Mr. Sothern nodded. There was probably never a gathering more dumbfounded than that present in the room. A few questions were asked, and then five gentlemen were appointed to examine Mr. Sothern's hands, etc., before he began his experiments. Having thoroughly washed the parts that he proposed to subject to the flames, Mr. Sothern began by burning his arm, and passing it through the gas-jet very slowly, twice stopping the motion...
Page 322 - I believe he professes to mesmerize, and is an imitator of the Davenport Brothers. He can get his hands out of any knot I can tie. His Dundreary is true comedy, not farce. He is as grave as a judge over it, and in that excellent quality a successor to Liston.

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