Hell's Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga

Front Cover
Modern Library, 1999 - Social Science - 265 pages
23 Reviews
"California, Labor Day weekend . . . early, with ocean fog still in the streets, outlaw motorcyclists wearing chains, shades and greasy Levis roll out from damp garages, all-night diners and cast-off one-night pads in Frisco, Hollywood, Berdoo and East Oakland, heading for the Monterey peninsula, north of Big Sur. . . The Menace is loose again."††Thus begins Hunter S. Thompson's vivid account of his experiences with California's most no-torious motorcycle gang, the Hell's Angels.†† In the mid-1960s, Thompson spent almost two years living with the controversial An-gels, cycling up and down the coast, reveling in the anarchic spirit of their clan, and, as befits their name, raising hell. His book successfully captures a singular moment in American history, when the biker lifestyle was first defined, and when such countercultural movements were electrifying and horrifying America. Thompson, the creator of Gonzo journalism, writes with his usual bravado, energy, and brutal honesty, and with a nuanced and incisive eye; as The New Yorker pointed out, "For all its uninhibited and sardonic humor, Thompson's book is a thoughtful piece of work." As illuminating now as when originally published in 1967, Hell's Angels is a gripping portrait, and the best account we have of the truth behind an American legend.




  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - flexatone - LibraryThing

Terrific proto-gonzo with a Grizzly-man style ending. It's a bit of a slow burn, but I don't mind. The occasional weird reference hits you from left field and makes your mind fuzzy. It's a fun read, and at this point, it's even a bit of American history. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - deebee1 - LibraryThing

Nelson Algren's own words describe this book best. The book asks why lost people sometimes develop into greater human beings than those who have never been lost in their whole lives. Why men who have ... Read full review

All 5 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
20
Section 4
33
Section 5
50
Section 6
56
Section 7
67
Section 8
77
Section 14
142
Section 15
151
Section 16
158
Section 17
167
Section 18
179
Section 19
187
Section 20
Z-1
Section 21
Z-6

Section 9
85
Section 10
97
Section 11
105
Section 12
115
Section 13
125
Section 22
Z-18
Section 23
Z-55
Section 24
Z-66
Section 25
Z-67
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern Library has been a staple of the American book trade, providing readers with affordable hardbound editions of important works of literature and thought. For the Modern Library's seventy-fifth anniversary, Random House redesigned the series, restoring as its emblem the running torchbearer created by Lucian Bernhard in 1925 and refurbishing jackets, bindings, and type, as well as inaugurating a new program of select-ing titles. The Modern Library continues to provide the world's best books, at the best prices.

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