Roman Imperialism and Civic Patronage: Form, Meaning and Ideology in Monumental Fountain Complexes

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Cambridge University Press, 2011 - Architecture - 277 pages
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In this book, Brenda Longfellow examines one of the features of Roman Imperial cities, the monumental civic fountain. Built in cities throughout the Roman Empire during the first through third centuries AD, these fountains were imposing in size, frequently adorned with grand sculptures, and often placed in highly trafficked areas. Over twenty-five of these urban complexes can be associated with emperors. Dr. Longfellow situates each of these examples within its urban environment and investigates the edifice as a product of an individual patron and a particular historical and geographical context. She also considers the role of civic patronage in fostering a dialogue between imperial and provincial elites with the local urban environment. Tracing the development of the genre across the empire, she illuminates the motives and ideologies of imperial and local benefactors in Rome and the provinces and explores the complex interplay of imperial power, patronage, and the local urban environment.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Precedents for Roman Monumental Civic Fountains
9
The Flavian Fountains in Rome
31
Monumental Civic Fountains
61
Expressing Gratitude
77
Lykiskos Dioskourides and
95
Hadrian and Roman Nymphaea
107
Greek Traditions Meet
113
Hadrian and Local Elites
140
Water as the Primary
147
Local Innovations in Architectural
156
Severan Emperors and the Return of Imperial Nymphaea
163
Great Nymphaeum in Leptis Magna
183
Imperial Patronage and Urban Display of Roman
205
Notes
213
Bibliography
251

First Forays into Athens
120
Hadrian in the City of Augustus
131

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About the author (2011)

Brenda Longfellow is assistant professor of ancient art at the University of Iowa, where she was awarded the James N. Murray Faculty Award for teaching, research, and service. She has received fellowships from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and the Loeb Classical Library Foundation. Her work has been published in The Art Bulletin.

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