Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Google eBook)

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Random House Publishing Group, Feb 26, 2008 - Fiction - 210 pages
67 Reviews
"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."
--John Brunner

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.

By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.

Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in.

Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
--Paul Williams, Rolling Stone


From the Trade Paperback edition.
  

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Review: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Blade Runner #1)

User Review  - Stuart - Goodreads

THE RED PILL OR THE BLUE PILL: Blade Runner Vs. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep Ridley Scott's 1982 film Blade Runner was arguably the most brilliant, though-provoking, and intelligent SF film ... Read full review

Review: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Blade Runner #1)

User Review  - Henry Avila - Goodreads

Rick Deckard, is a bounty hunter for the San Francisco police, the year 2021 ( January 3rd). His mission is to "retire" six androids, who fled bleak Mars, and illegally came to Earth. World War ... Read full review

All 10 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
2
Section 2
3
Section 3
15
Section 4
27
Section 5
35
Section 6
48
Section 7
61
Section 8
69
Section 13
129
Section 14
145
Section 15
154
Section 16
166
Section 17
184
Section 18
196
Section 19
203
Section 20
216

Section 9
84
Section 10
97
Section 11
112
Section 12
121
Section 21
225
Section 22
228
Section 23
236
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Phillip Kindred Dick is an American science fiction writer best known for his psychological portrayals of characters trapped in illusory environments. Born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1928, Dick worked in radio and studied briefly at the University of California at Berkeley before embarking on his writing career. His first novel, Solar Lottery, was published in 1955. In 1962, Dick won the Hugo Award for his novel, The Man in the High Castle. He also wrote a series of futuristic tales about artificial creatures on the loose; notable of these was Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, which was later adapted into film as Blade Runner. Dick also published several collections of short stories. He died in Santa Ana, California, in 1982.

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