Francis Bacon: an account of his life and works (Google eBook)

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Macmillan and co., 1885 - Bacon, Francis - 504 pages
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Page 424 - Indies: also the inventor of ships: your monk that was the inventor of ordnance and of gunpowder:* the inventor of music: the inventor of letters: the inventor of printing: the inventor of observations of astronomy: the inventor of works in metal: the inventor of glass: the inventor of silk of the worm: the inventor of wine: the inventor of corn and bread: the inventor of sugars:* and all these by more certain tradition than you have. Then...
Page 424 - For our ordinances and rites: we have two very long and fair galleries: in one of these we place patterns and samples of all manner of the more rare and excellent inventions: in the other we place the statua's of all principal inventors. There we have the statua of your Columbus, that discovered the West Indies: also the inventor of ships: your monk that was the inventor of ordnance and of gunpowder: the inventor of music: the inventor of letters: the inventor of printing: the inventor of...
Page 452 - Yet there happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking; his language, where he could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered.
Page 453 - It seems to me that Pygmalion's frenzy is a good emblem or portraiture of this vanity : for words are but the images of matter, and except they have life of reason and invention, to fall in love with them is all one as to fall in love with a picture.
Page 31 - Besides my innumerable sins, I confess before thee, that I am debtor to Thee for the gracious talent of thy gifts and graces, which I have neither put into a napkin, nor put it, as I ought, to exchangers, where it might have made best profit, but misspent it in things for which I was least fit; so I may truly say, my soul hath been a stranger in the course of my pilgrimage.
Page 449 - ... full of savage and unreclaimed desires of profit — of lust— of revenge ; which, as long as they give ear to precepts, to laws, to religion, sweetly touched with eloquence, and persuasion of books, of sermons, of harangues, so long is society and peace maintained ; but if these instruments be silent, or sedition and tumult make them not audible, all things dissolve into anarchy and confusion.
Page 436 - Which is the cause that hath made me choose to write certain brief notes, set down rather significantly than curiously, which I have called Essays, — the word is late but the thing is ancient. For Seneca's Epistles to Lucilius, if one mark them well, are but Essays, — that is, dispersed meditations, though conveyed in the form of epistles.
Page 423 - The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes, and secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
Page 449 - Kings do more easily find instruments for their will and humour, than for their service and honour; he had gotten for his purpose, or beyond his purpose, two instruments, Empson and Dudley, whom the people esteemed as his horse-leeches and shearers, bold men and careless of fame, and that took toll of their master's grist.
Page 29 - I commend myself unto your Lordship. I wax now somewhat ancient ; one and thirty years is a great deal of sand in the hour-glass. My health, I thank God, I find confirmed ; and I do not fear that action shall impair it, because I account my ordinary course of study and meditation to be more painful than most parts of action are.

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