Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, Volume 9 (Google eBook)

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W. Orr, 1841 - London (England)
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Page 160 - I have seen a small manufactory of this kind, where ten men only were employed, and where some of them consequently performed two or three distinct operations. But though they were very poor, and therefore but indifferently accommodated with the necessary machinery, they could,, when they exerted themselves, make among them about twelve pounds of pins in a day.
Page 78 - ... the print of his feet are still to be seen, and hurled his bolts among them till the whole were slaughtered, except the big bull, who presenting his forehead to the shafts, shook them off as they fell ; but missing one at length, it wounded him in the side ; whereon, springing round, he bounded over the Ohio, over the Wabash, the Illinois, and finally over the great lakes, where he is living at this day.
Page 37 - They will not live together, but every chigoe sets up a separate ulcer, and has his own private portion of pus. Flies get entry into your mouth, into your eyes, into your nose ; you eat flies, drink flies, and breathe flies. Lizards, cockroaches, and snakes, get into the bed ; ants eat up the books ; scorpions sting you on the foot.
Page 54 - For when to future years thou extend'st thy cares, Thou deal'st in other men's affairs. Ev'n aged men, as if they truly were Children again, for age prepare ; Provisions for long travel they design, In the last point of their short line. Wisely the ant against poor winter hoards The stock which summer's wealth affords; In grasshoppers...
Page 38 - When I upon thy bosom lean And fondly clasp thee a' my ain, I glory in the sacred ties That made us ane, wha ance were twain: A mutual flame inspires us baith, The tender look, the melting kiss: Even years shall ne'er destroy our love, But only gie us change o
Page 26 - like the baseless fabric of a vision, and left not a wreck behind ;" so thoroughly had nine-tenths of them taken up their abode in the bread basket (vide Jon Bee) of the Man-Mountain ; the remaining tenth sufficed for the rest of the company, viz.
Page 131 - Some blamed, others praised him for his courage. The king said he had put off this excursion for more than five years, because he was aware that it would be attended with infinite trouble, and told the prince that he ought to have had but two tables, and not have been at the expense of so many, and declared he would never VOL. XIX. i L suffer him to do so again ; but all this was too late for poor Vatel.
Page 84 - I was forced instead thereof to apply a digestive made of the yolks of eggs, oil of roses, and turpentine. In the night I could not sleep in quiet, fearing some default in not...
Page 78 - And then they likewise shall Their ruin have, For as yourselves your empires fall, And every kingdom hath a grave. Thus those celestial fires, Though seeming mute, The fallacy of our desires And all the pride of life confute. For they have watched since first The world had birth; And found sin in itself accurst, And nothing permanent on earth.
Page 85 - Dublin for a crime of the same stamp, and there condemned and executed. Between his conviction and execution, and again at the fatal tree, he confessed himself to be the very Thomas Geddely who had committed the robbery at York for which the unfortunate James Crow had been executed. We must add, that a gentleman, an inhabitant of York, happening to be in Dublin at the time of Geddely's...

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