Negative Horizon (e)

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Continuum International Publishing Group, Limited, Jul 27, 2006 - Philosophy - 224 pages
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Negative Horizon is Paul Virilio's most original and unified exploration of the key themes and ideas running through his philosophy. Provocative and forceful, it sets out Virilio's theory of dromoscopy: a means of apprehending speed and its pivotal - and potentially destructive - role in contemporary global society. Applying this theory to Western political and military history, Virilio exposes a compulsion to accelerate, and the rise of a politics of time over territorial politics of space. In exposing what he believes to be the consequences of this constant acceleration for human sensory perception and, ultimately, global democracy, Virilio offers a vision of history and politics as disturbing as it is original.

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Review: Negative Horizon: An Essay in Dromoscopy

User Review  - Tim - Goodreads

The introduction is great Read full review

Review: Negative Horizon: An Essay in Dromoscopy

User Review  - Dagezi - Goodreads

Weirdly misogynist and able-bodied-ist. Open Sky was much better. Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Paul Virilio (b. 1932 in Paris) is a world-renowned philosopher, urbanist, and cultural theorist. His work focuses on urban spaces and the development of technology in relation to power and speed. He is known for his coining of the term 'dromology' to explain his theory of speed and technology. Paul Virilio is of mixed ancestry, being the son of an Italian father (who identified as a Communist) and a Breton mother. As a small child in France during the Second World War, Paul Virilio was profoundly impacted by the blitzkrieg and total war; however, these early experiences shaped his understanding of the movement and speed which structures modern society. In order to escape the heavy fighting in the city, he fled with his family to the port of Nantes in 1939.

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