The Psychology of Computer Programming

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Dorset House Pub., Jan 1, 1998 - Computers - 292 pages
14 Reviews
Discover or Revisit One of the Most Popular Books in Computing This landmark 1971 classic is reprinted with a new preface, chapter-by-chapter commentary, and straight-from-the-heart observations on topics that affect the professional life of programmers. Long regarded as one of the first books to pioneer a people-oriented approach to computing, The Psychology of Computer Programming endures as a penetrating analysis of the intelligence, skill, teamwork, and problem-solving power of the computer programmer. Finding the chapters strikingly relevant to today's issues in programming, Gerald M. Weinberg adds new insights and highlights the similarities and differences between now and then. Using a conversational style that invites the reader to join him, Weinberg reunites with some of his most insightful writings on the human side of software engineering. Topics include egoless programming, intelligence, psychological measurement, personality factors, motivation, training, social problems on large projects, problem-solving ability, programming language design, team formation, the programming environment, and much more. Dorset House Publishing is proud to make this important text available to new generations of programmers--and to encourage readers of the first edition to return to its valuable lessons.

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One of these books is not like the others: this one. This is not about programming techniques or algorithms, it is about what programmers are like: it is a book that recognizes that programmers are people, not machines for entering text.

Review: The Psychology of Computer Programming

User Review  - Steve Losh - Goodreads

A fantastic, practical introduction to thinking about the psychology of computer programming. Unlike most books, the author isn't afraid to say "we don't know" when there's a question they don't have the answer to. It's a refreshingly honest feeling book. Read full review

Contents

PART1 PROGRAMMING
2
What Makes a Good Program?
15
How Can We Study Programming?
27
Copyright

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