Netter's Essential Histology

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Saunders/Elsevier, 2008 - Medical - 493 pages
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Netter's Essential Histology integrates gross anatomy and embryology with classic histology slides and cutting-edge scanning electron microscopy to give you a rich visual understanding of this complex subject. This histology textbook-atlas has a strong anatomy foundation and utilizes a variety of visual elements - including Netter illustrations and light and electron micrographs - to teach you the most indispensible histologic concepts and their clinical relevance. Excellent as both a reference and a review, Netter's Essential Histology will serve you well at any stage of your healthcare career.




  • Gain a rich understanding of this vital subject through the succinct explanatory histology text.
  • Learn to recognize both normal and diseased structures at the microscopic level with the aid of succinct explanatory text as well as numerous clinical boxes.
  • Access the entire contents and ancillary components online at Student Consult, view images and histology slides at different magnifications, and watch new narrated video overviews of each chapter.
  • Take your learning one step further with the purchase of Netter's Histology Flash Cards (sold separately), designed to reinforce your understanding of how the human body works in health as well as illness and injury.


  • Thoroughly comprehend how function is linked to structure through brand-new electron micrographs, many of which have been enhanced and colorized to show ultra-structures in 3D.

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Contents

The Cell
1
Epithelium and Exocrine Glands
29
Connective Tissue
51
Copyright

19 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Frank H. Netter was born in New York City in 1906. He studied art at the Art Students League and the National Academy of Design before entering medical school at New York University, where he received his Doctor of Medicine degree in 1931. During his student years, Dr. Netter's notebook sketches attracted the attention of the medical faculty and other physicians, allowing him to augment his income by illustrating articles and textbooks. He continued illustrating as a sideline after establishing a surgical practice in 1933, but he ultimately opted to give up his practice in favor of a full-time commitment to art. After service in the United States Army during World War II, Dr. Netter began his long collaboration with the CIBA Pharmaceutical Company (now Novartis Pharmaceuticals). This 45-year partnership resulted in the production of the extraordinary collection of medical art so familiar to physicians and other medical professionals worldwide.
Icon Learning Systems acquired the Netter Collection in July 2000 and continued to update Dr. Netter's original paintings and to add newly commissioned paintings by artists trained in the style of Dr. Netter. In 2005, Elsevier Inc. purchased the Netter Collection and all publications from Icon Learning Systems. There are now over 50 publications featuring the art of Dr. Netter available through Elsevier Inc.
Dr. Netter's works are among the finest examples of the use of illustration in the teaching of medical concepts. The 13-book Netter Collection of Medical Illustrations, which includes the greater part of the more than 20,000 paintings created by Dr. Netter, became and remains one of the most famous medical works ever published. The Netter Atlas of Human Anatomy, first published in 1989, presents the anatomic paintings from the Netter Collection. Now translated into 16 languages, it is the anatomy atlas of choice among medical and health professions students the world over.
The Netter illustrations are appreciated not only for their aesthetic qualities, but, more importantly, for their intellectual content. As Dr. Netter wrote in 1949 "clarification of a subject is the aim and goal of illustration. No matter how beautifully painted, how delicately and subtly rendered a subject may be, it is of little value as a medical illustration if it does not serve to make clear some medical point.? Dr. Netter's planning, conception, point of view, and approach are what inform his paintings and what make them so intellectually valuable.
Frank H. Netter, MD, physician and artist, died in 1991.

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