Elegant Extracts: Or Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Vicesimus Knox
C. and J. Rivington, 1824 - English prose literature - 772 pages
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Contents

On the Immortality of the Soul
15
Duty of Children to their Parents
16
Strength of Parental Affection
17
Remarks on the Swiftness of Time Idler
19
Folly of mispcnding Time Kami
20
Importance of Time Sped
22
Punishment of mispenl Time Guard
24
Importance of Time to Yonth Chalcrf
26
Bad Effects of Indolence Connois
27
Innocent Pleasures of Childhood Guard
29
Cheerfulness recommended Spect
31
Advantages of a cheerful Temper
32
On Truth and Sincerity
33
Roles for the Knowledge of Ones Self
35
No Life pleasing to God but that which is useful to Mankind Adcen
36
Providence proved by Animal In stinct Spec
39
Necessity of forming religious Princi ples at an early Age Blair
41
Happiness and Dignity of Manhood depend on youthful Conduct
42
Modesty and Docility joined to Piety
43
Benevofence and Humanity
44
Whatever violates Nature cannot af ford true Pleasure
45
Employment of Time
46
Unhapniness of not early improving the Mind
47
Great Talents not requisite for the common Duties of Life
48
Pleasures resulting from a prudent Use of our Faculties
49
Lost Opportunities cannot be re called Toltie
50
Beginnings of Evil to be resisted Blair
51
necessary in Business Time c
52
Suppression of criminal Thoughts
53
Government of the Temper 54
54
Exertions of a benevolent Temper
55
Usefulness of a Desire of Praise
56
Usefulness of virtuous Discipline
57
Sense of Right and Wrong c Gregory
58
Comforts of Religion
59
Advantages of Devotion
60
Beauties of the Psalms Home
61
Temple of Virtuous Love Taller
62
of Lust
63
of Avarice
64
Balance of Happiness equal Blair
65
Virtue Mans true Interest Harris
66
Retigion the foundation of Content Adven
67
Bad Company Iifi
70
Religion the best and only Support in Cases of real Distress Sterne
71
On Prodigality Ramb
72
On Honour Guard
73
On Modesty
74
On disinterested Friendship Mclmotk
75
The Art of Happiness Harris
77
The Choice of Hercules Tatter
78
On Entrance into Life Knoc
79
Wisdom of aiming at Perfection
81
On forming a Taste for simple Plea sures
83
Hints to those designed for the Life of a Gentleman
85
il Effects of Ridicule
87
Value of an honest Man
90
A short System of Virtue and Happi ness
92
An Address to a young Scholar
94
On Goodness of Heart
95
Nobleman Ballon
97
CATECHETICAL LECTURES Sect Authors Pag 99 Introduction to the Catechism Gilpin
101
On the Creedthe Belief of God 101 On the Belief of Jesus Christ 102 On the Conception and Birth of Christ 103 On Christs AscensionBelief in
103
Holy Ghost
107
On the Holy Catholic Church
113
On the Resurrection of the Body 106 On the Ten Commandments
116
Worship and Honour of God
118
Honour due to Gods Word 109 Duties owing to particular Persons
122
Duty ti our Teachers and Instruc tors
123
Behaviour to Superiors
125
Against wronging our Neighbour by injurious Words 113 Against wronging our Neighbour by injurious Actions
128
Duties to ourselves
130
On coveting other Mens Goods 116 On the Sacrament of Baptism
134
On the Sacrament of the Lords Supper135
135
Expostulation with Unbelievers M Ptucal
137
On the Old and New Testament
141
To the Sceptics and Infidels of the Age Bp Watson
143
A Prayer or Psalm Lord Bacon 112 Doctrine of Christ a Doctrine of Truth and Simplicity Dr Clarke
153
Light of Reason imperfect Lord LiMelon 124 Simplicity of the Sacred Writers West
154
Superiority of Christian Philosophy over Stoical Miss Carter
156
Fine Morality of the Gospel Beattie
158
Simplicity of the Gospel gives it an Air of Sublimity Matnaaring
159
Prince Eugenes Prayer
160
Sect Authors Par 1 State of the Argument Paley
162
Application of the Argument
165
The Succession of Plants and Ani mals
173
Classical and Historical 132 Scriptures the Rule of Life Chapone 133 Of Genesis
175
Exodus 135 Leviticus Numbers Deutero nomy
176
Joshua 137 Judges Samuel and Kings
177
Chronicles Ezra Nehemiah and Esther 139 Job 140 the Psalms
178
The New Testament
179
143our Saviours Example
181
Character of St Paul
182
Of the Epistles 147 Epistles of St James
183
Epistles of St Peter
184
Prudence
185
Pity
186
Woman
187
Son
188
Death
189
A Morning Prayer for a Young Student Knox
190
DENEFICIAL Effects of a Taste X for the Belles Lettres Blair
192
Effects of the Cultivation of Taste 3 Improvement of Taste 4 On Style
193
Perspicuity 6 Purity and Propriety
194
Precision 8 Use and Importance of Precision
195
Causes of a loose Style
196
Style general Characters of 11 Austere Florid and Middle 12 Concise 13 Diffuse 192 192 193 193 194 194 195 195 196 197 197
197
Nervous and Feeble
198
the Dry
199
the Neat
200
Jl Simplicity different Kinds of
201
Simplicity appears easy Blair
202
Simplicity Ancients eminent for
203
of Mr Addisons Style
204
On the Vehement Style
205
Sweetness and Delicacy of Style Knor
206
Directions for forming a Style Blair
208
Words too anxious a Care abont to be avoided
209
Style must be adapted to the Subject
210
Livius Navius and Enniui
211
Plautus
212
43 Afranius
213
the Criticisms of Cicero c
214
the flourishing State of Poetry among the Romans
215
Observations on the neid
216
Of Horace
217
fil Phaednw
218
the Poets wbose Works have not come down to us
219
Lucan
220
His Description of a Seafight 320
221
59Martial
222
Juvenal
223
On the Character and Style of Pliny the Younger
225
The Introducuon c of Arts at Rome Spence
227
Marcellusa Attack on Syracuse
228
Introduction into Italy of the Works of the ancient Artists
229
Decline of the Arts Eloquence and Poetry on Augustuss Death
231
contrasted with Ksrliincs
232
Cicero his Eloquence
233
and Demosthenes compared
234
Means of improving in Eloquence
236
Attention to the best Models
237
B2 Use of Critical and Rhetorical Wri ters
238
Necessity of a Classical Education Fcltan
239
Greek and Roman Writers compared
240
Directions in reading the Classics
242
Commendation of Schools
243
On forming a Style
244
Mastery of Language
245
Plainness and Perspicuity
246
Metaphors and Similitudes
247
Epithets
248
Rules of Order and Proportion
249
A Recapitulation
250
How to form a right Taste
251
Taste to be improved by Imitation 8J2 Sect Authors Pag 107 On the Historical Style Blair
252
Sallust and Livy
253
Their Use in Style Felton
254
Milton and Philips
255
Moderns excel the Ancients
256
Excellencies of the Ancients and Moderns
257
Assiduous Study of the Greek and Roman Classics recommended
258
On the Beauty of Epistolary Writing
259
Ciceros
260
Pindar the Father of Lyric Poetry
261
Politian and Muretus Knox
262
Philelphus and Theodore Gaza
263
the Characters ofTheophrastus c
275
Cicero Blackmail
277
Thoughts on the OBdipui Tyrannus of Sophocles Knox
279
Remarks on Minor Greek Poets
280
Morals of the Classics Blackwall
285
Directions for Reading the Classics
286
The subordinate Classics not to be neglected
287
The old Critics to be studied
288
Rise of Philosophical Criticism Harris
289
On some Passages in Aristotles Rhetoric Knox
290
Romarf Authors of Philosophical Criticism Harris
291
Modern Philosophical and Histo rical Critics
292
Modern Critics Writers c
293
1T4 Rise of Corrective Criticism 29S 175 Criticism of Use to Literature
294
lence
296
ISO Advice to a Beginner in Criticism
297
On other Decorations of Prose as Alliteration
298
The Period
299
Authorities alleged
300
Verbal Decorations not Minutiae
301
And in the Menexenus of Plato
303
Accuracy
304
What Metaphors the best
305
On Knigmas and Puns
306
No Genius without Rules
307
Rules did always eiist
308
Sect Authors Im
309
History 4c of the Middle Age
311
Athens an historical Account of
312
Synesiuss subsequent Ac count of
315
Anecdote of the Modern Greeks
316
Character of the Man of Business often united with that of the Scholar and Philosopher
318
Progressions of Art disgustful the Completion beautiful
319
On Conversation Uther
320
On Music
321
On Sculpture and Painting
322
On Architecture
324
On Novelty 325
325
SenseTaste and Genius distinguished
326
Thoughts on the Human Capacity
328
General Reflections on Good Taste Rollin
329
Dr JOHNSONS Preface to bis Edi tion of Sbakspeare Johnson
334
POPES Preface to his Homer Pope
347
THIRST Oration against Philip Ltland
359
A Oration against Cataline Whitwarlli
366
Oration for Archias
373
Oration of Pericles Thacyd
379
Romulus to the Romans Hooke
383
Scipios Answer
384
Charidemus Q Curt
385
Brutus vindicates Ctcsars Murder Shak
386
Titus Quinctius to the Romans Hovke
388
Micipsa to Jugurtha Sallust
389
Hannibal to the Carthaginian Army
391
Scythian Ambas to Alexander Q Curt
392
Junius Brutus over Lucretia f in
393
Canuleius to the Roman Consuls Hooke
395
Speech on reducing the Army Pulteney
396
for repealing the Septennial Act Sir John St Avbm
398
The Ministers Reply to Ditto Watpole
400
Speech on Repeal of the Jew Bill Lylt
402
LORD CHATHAM on Taxing America 26 on a charge brought against certain Members of pie House as giving birth to Sedition in America on the ...
404
tering Soldiers in America His Speech for
405
immediate removal of the Troops from Boston in America
406
on moving an A mendment to the Address
408
on Lord Suffolks Proposal to employ Indians in the War
410
BORISS Conclusion of his Speech to the Electors of Bristol 401 404 405 406 406 410
411
Speeches on the Functions of Ju ries in Cases of Libel MR Foxs Speech 33 MR ERSKINBI Speech on the same subject
414
MR SHERIDANS Speech upon the Begum Charge
422
MB GRATTAMS Speech on the De claration of Right
424
upon the De claration of Right being carried
427
on the Sale 411 420 422 424 427 430 of Peerages
430
MR CVRRANS Speech in Defence of Mr Hamilton Rowan
432
in Defence of Mr Finnerty
433
Character of Marius Middlclon
434
Sylla
435
Pompey
436
Julius Cffisar
438
Hannibal Lny
439
Character of Martin Luther Robertson
446
Alfred K of England Htme
447
Character of William the Conqueror Htme
449
Character of William Rufus Smollelt
450
Another Lmgartl
451
Character of Stephen Hume
453
Lingard
455
Narratives Dialogues with humorous facetious and other miscellaneous
507
The Monk Sterne
514
The Hill of Science a Vision Aikin
521
Ulysses and Circe Dial Dead
528
Dialogue between the Plinys Dial Dead
534
Scene between lago and Cassio Shakt
540
teaches us to select our Coin 573 Rambler
573
674
574
Hume
575
Filzosb 668
576
Rambler
578
Blackstone
579
Orrery
583
Habit Difficulty of conquering Idler
584
History our natural Fondness for it and its true Use Baling
585
Human Nature its Dignity Hume
587
Operas ridiculed LytteUon
588
Players in a Country Town described Connoiss
590
often mistake the Effect 691
591
Poet Business and Qualifications of described Johnson
592
Remarks on some of the best both Ancient and Modern Dryden 69 Remarks on some of the best English Dramatic ones
593
Riddles defended Fitzosb
596
Suicide Essay on Connoist 73 Enumeration of Superstitions observed in the Country 74 Swearing indelicate and wicked 75 Sympathy a Source of t...
600
Tears not unworthy of an Hero Dryden
604
Terror a Source of the Sublime Burke
605
Translations History of Idler
607
Talents to form a good Translator Dryd
609
Wit the Nature of in Writing
611
Examples that Words may affect without raising Images Burke
612
Characteristics of Whig and Tory Parties Hume
613
Painting disagreeable in Women Connoiss
614
Astronomy Study of delightful Tatler
615
Character of Toby Bumper Connoiss
616
Causes of National Characters
617
Characters of Gamesters 92 Tatlers Advice to his Sister 93 On Curiosity 94 Controversy seldom decently con ducted Browne
618
Tatler
620
Sterne
621
Conversation how to please in Rambler i
623
Citizens Country House described
624
Humorous Scene between Dennis the Critic and the Doctor Swift
625
The Two Bees Anon
627
Falstaffs Encomiums on Sack Skaks
628
The Perfect Speaker
629
Character of a Choice Spirit
630
A Citizens Family setting out for Brighthelmstone
631
Character of a mighty good Kind of Man
633
Character of a mighty good Sort of Woman
634
On the affected Strangeness of some Men of Quality
636
On the Arrogance of younger Bro thers of Quality
637
Persons of Quality proved Traders
639
On Pedantry
641
A Sunday in the Country
642
On the Militia
643
On going to Bath c
645
The fainthearted Lover
647
Letter from a successful Adventurer in the Lottery
652
Characters of Camilla and Flora Greville
653
A Fable by Linnaeus Dr Thornton
654
Mercy recommended Sterne
655
The Captive
656
Health
657
sits the Author in his Confinement III The Emperor and his No bility diverted by him
666
Metropolis described 670
670
Author prevents an Invasion
672
Inhabitants of Lilliput
675
Authors Escape to Blefuscu
679
Return to his Native Country
683
A Voyage to Brobdingnag Chap I A great Storm described
686
Description of the Farmers Daughter
692
The Country described
699
Adventures that happened to the Author
701
Contrivances of the Author to please the King and Queen
706
Authors Love of his Country
710
His Return to England 713
717
Various
718
Detached Sentences 130 Proverbs 131 Old Italian Proverbs
728
emark lu Franklin
741
Eustace
745
Celebration of Divine Service by the Pope
746
nlions and of the Eras of Men illustrious for Learning and Genius
747

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Page 13 - Behold, I go forward, but he is not there ; and backward, but I cannot perceive him : on the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him : he hideth himself on the right hand, that I cannot see him : but he knoweth the way that I take : when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold.
Page 388 - Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.
Page 342 - ... let but a quibble spring up before him, and he leaves his work unfinished. A quibble is the golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content to purchase it by the sacrifice of reason, propriety, and truth. A quibble was to him the fatal Cleopatra for which he lost the world, and was content to lose it.
Page 411 - German despot; your attempts will be for ever vain and impotent - doubly so, indeed, from this mercenary aid on which you rely ; for it irritates, to an incurable resentment, the minds of your adversaries, to overrun them with the mercenary sons of rapine and plunder, devoting them and their possessions to the rapacity of hireling cruelty. If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms: Never, never, never...
Page 338 - ... the real state of sublunary nature, which partakes of good and evil, joy and sorrow, mingled with endless variety of proportion and innumerable modes of combination; and expressing the course of the world, in which the loss of one is the gain of another; in which, at the same time, the reveller is hasting to his wine, and the mourner burying his friend; in which the malignity of one is sometimes defeated by the frolic of another; and many mischiefs and many benefits are done and hindered without...
Page 2 - I see multitudes of people passing over it, said I, and a black cloud hanging on each end of it. As I looked more attentively, I saw several of the passengers dropping through the bridge, into the great tide that flowed underneath it ; and upon...
Page 159 - Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, 'Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: for I was an hungred and ye gave me meat, I was thirsty and ye gave me drink, I was a stranger and ye took me in; naked and ye clothed me, I was sick and ye visited me, I was in prison and ye came unto me.
Page 412 - I call upon the honour of your Lordships to reverence the dignity of your ancestors, and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country to vindicate the national character.
Page 411 - I CANNOT, my Lords, I will not, join in congratulation on misfortune and disgrace. This, my Lords, is a perilous and tremendous moment. It is not a time for adulation: the smoothness of flattery cannot save us in this rugged and awful crisis. It is now necessary to instruct the throne in the language of truth. We must, if possible, dispel the delusion and darkness which envelop it ; and display, in its full danger and genuine colors, the ruin which is brought to our doors.
Page 3 - ... falling waters, human voices, and musical instruments. Gladness grew in me upon the discovery of so delightful a scene. I wished for the wings of an eagle that I might fly away to those happy seats ; but the genius told me there was no passage to them except through the gates of death that I saw opening every moment upon the bridge. 'The islands...

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