Triumph of the Egg

Front Cover
1st World Publishing, Oct 1, 2004 - Fiction - 236 pages
4 Reviews
There is a story. - I cannot tell it. - I have no words. The story is almost forgotten but sometimes I remember. The story concerns three men in a house in a street. If I could say the words I would sing the story. I would whisper it into the ears of women, of mothers. I would run through the streets saying it over and over. My tongue would be torn loose - it would rattle against my teeth. The three men are in a room in the house. One is young and dandified. He continually laughs. There is a second man who has a long white beard. He is consumed with doubt but occasionally his doubt leaves him and he sleeps.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CurrerBell - LibraryThing

A mixed bag of stories and definitely inferior to Winesburg, Ohio, but a few (particularly "The Egg") are classics. Note that this particular Kindle edition lacks the title of the final story, "The ... Read full review

Review: Triumph of the Egg

User Review  - Bill S. - Goodreads

I guess I did Anderson backwards. Winesburg Ohio is his masterpiece and the consensus seems to be that he declined after this and hurt his reputation by tackling novels -- a format he never mastered ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

THE DUMB MAN
7
I WANT TO KNOW WHY
10
SEEDS
23
THE OTHER WOMAN
34
THE EGG
45
UNLIGHTED LAMPS
59
SENILITY
84
THE MAN IN THE BROWN COAT
88
BROTHERS
93
THE DOOR OF THE TRAP
105
THE NEW ENGLANDER
120
WAR
142
MOTHERHOOD
148
OUT OF NOWHERE INTO NOTHING
151
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Sherwood Anderson was born on September 13, 1876, in Camden, Ohio, and grew up in nearby Clyde. In 1898 he joined the U.S. Army and served in the Spanish-American War. In 1900 he enrolled in the Wittenberg Academy. The following year he moved to Chicago where he began a successful business career in advertising. Despite his business success, in 1912 Anderson walked away to pursue writing full time. His first novel was Windy McPherson's Son, published in 1916, and his second was Marching Men, published in 1917. The phenomenally successful Winesburg, Ohio, a collection of short stories about fictionalized characters in a small midwestern town, followed in 1919. Anderson wrote novels including The Triumph of the Egg, Poor White, Many Marriages, and Dark Laughter, but it was his short stories that made him famous. Through his short stories he revolutionized short fiction and altered the direction of the modern short story. He is credited with influencing such writers as William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Anderson died in March, 1941, of peritonitis suffered during a trip to South America. The epitaph he wrote for himself proclaims, "Life, not death, is the great adventure.

Bibliographic information