Memoirs of Anne C. L. Botta (Google eBook)

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J.S. Tait & sons, 1894 - 459 pages
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Page 358 - We wither from our youth, we gasp away — Sick — sick ; unfound the boon — unslaked the thirst, Though to the last, in verge of our decay, Some phantom lures, such as we sought at first — But all too late, — so are we doubly curst, Love, fame, ambition, avarice — 'tis the same — Each idle, and all ill, and none the worst — For all are meteors with a different name, And Death the sable smoke where vanishes the flame.
Page 250 - Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And, departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time ; Footprints, that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main, A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, shall take heart again.
Page 297 - Behold, the eye of the LORD is upon them that fear him, Upon them that hope in his mercy ; To deliver their soul from death, And to keep them alive in famine.
Page 247 - One adequate support For the calamities of mortal life Exists — one only; an assured belief That the procession of our fate, howe'er Sad or disturbed, is ordered by a Being Of infinite benevolence and power; Whose everlasting purposes embrace All accidents, converting them to good.
Page 430 - The house is made habitable, but there is not a single apartment finished, and all withinside, except the plastering, has been done since Briesler came. We have not the least fence, yard, or other convenience, without, and the great unfinished audience-room I make a dryingroom of, to hang up the clothes in. The principal stairs are not up, and will not be this winter.
Page 430 - If the twelve years, in which this place has been considered as the future seat of government, had been improved, as they would have been if in New England, very many of the present inconveniences would have been removed. It is a beautiful spot, capable of every improvement, and, the more I view it, the more I am delighted with it...
Page 34 - Green be the turf above thee, Friend of my better days ! None knew thee but to love thee, Nor named thee but to praise.
Page 208 - Life ! we've been long together, Through pleasant and through cloudy weather ; 'Tis hard to part when friends are dear — Perhaps 'twill cost a sigh, a tear : — Then steal away, give little warning, Choose thine own time ; Say not ' Good night ' — but in some brighter clime Bid me
Page 28 - Speak low ! tread softly through these halls ; Here Genius lives enshrined ; Here reign, in silent majesty, The monarchs of the mind. A mighty spirit-host they come From every age and clime ; Above the buried wrecks of years They breast the tide of time.
Page 315 - OH ! ask not, hope thou not too much Of sympathy below ; Few are the hearts whence one same touch Bids the sweet fountains flow: Few— and by still conflicting powers Forbidden here to meet — Such ties would make this life of ours Too fair for aught so fleet.

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