Smoke Bellew

Front Cover
1st World Library, Feb 20, 2007 - 178 pages
10 Reviews
In the beginning he was Christopher Bellew. By the time he was at college he had become Chris Bellew. Later, in the Bohemian crowd of San Francisco, he was called Kit Bellew. And in the end he was known by no other name than Smoke Bellew. And this history of the evolution of his name is the history of his evolution. Nor would it have happened had he not had a fond mother and an iron uncle, and had he not received a letter from Gillet Bellamy. "I have just seen a copy of the Billow," Gillet wrote from Paris. "Of course O'Hara will succeed with it. But he's missing some plays." (Here followed details in the improvement of the budding society weekly.) "Go down and see him. Let him think they're your own suggestions. Don't let him know they're from me. If he does, he'll make me Paris correspon-dent, which I can't afford, because I'm getting real money for my stuff from the big magazines. Above all, don't forget to make him fire that dub who's doing the musical and art criticism. Another thing, San Francisco has always had a literature of her own. But she hasn't any now. Tell him to kick around and get some gink to turn out a live serial, and to put into it the real romance and glamour and colour of San Francisco."

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Review: Smoke Bellew

User Review  - Karen - Goodreads

This book is much funnier than any other Jack London that I remember reading. I read it while on a trip to Alaska which made it a very fitting and fun (if not particularly realistic) story about the Yukon gold rush. Read full review

Review: Smoke Bellew

User Review  - Goodreads

This book is much funnier than any other Jack London that I remember reading. I read it while on a trip to Alaska which made it a very fitting and fun (if not particularly realistic) story about the Yukon gold rush. Read full review

About the author (2007)

Jack London (1876-1916) was an American writer who produced two hundred short stories, more than four hundred nonfiction pieces, twenty novels, and three full-length plays in less than two decades. His best-known works include The Call of the Wild, The Sea Wolf, and White Fang.

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