Modern Japan: A Social and Political History

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Psychology Press, 2002 - History - 258 pages
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According to some politicians and much of the mainstream media, immigrant populations only contribute crime to their communities. Seen as unmotivated and unemployed, these immigrants are thought to be a threat to society's moral fiber, and a burden to its justice system.

Ramiro Martinez tells a very different story in Latino Homicide. Studying five major cities--Chicago, El Paso, Houston, Miami, and San Diego--Martinez reveals Latino homicide rates to be markedly lower than one would expect, given the economic deprivation of these urban areas. Far from dangerous or criminal, these communities often have exceptionally strong social networks precisely because of their shared immigrant experiences. With fascinating case studies drawn from police reports and actual cases, Latino Homicide refutes negative stereotypes in a coherent and critically rigorous analysis of the issues.
  

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Good, easy to understand about Tokugawa period

Contents

Tokugawa background The ideal and the real
1
The midcentury crisis
18
The early Meiji Revolution
36
The 1880s and 1890s Defining a Japanese national identity
55
Late Meiji An end and a beginning
72
An emerging mass society Demands for equity and the dilemmas of choice
88
Contesting the modern in the 1930s
108
The dark valley
125
Conflict and consensus in the 1950s
161
The economic miracle and its underside
177
The rich country
191
The lost decade
210
Glossary of Japanese terms
229
Further reading
231
Notes
243
Index
251

Enduring the unendurable and starting over in the new Japan
143

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2002)

Tipton is senior lecturer in Japanese Studies at the School of Asian Studies, University of Sydney.

Bibliographic information