A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (Google eBook)

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Open Court Publishing Company, 1904 - Idealism - 128 pages
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Review: A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

User Review  - Rlotz - Goodreads

George Berkeley was an English philosopher in the empiricist school. In this short treatise, he put forward many of his most influential ideas, including his critique of intellectual abstraction, and ... Read full review

Review: A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

User Review  - Lotz - Goodreads

George Berkeley was an English philosopher in the empiricist school. In this short treatise, he put forward many of his most influential ideas, including his critique of intellectual abstraction, and ... Read full review

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Page v - So much understanding, so much knowledge, so much innocence, and such humility, I did not think had been the portion of any but angels, till I saw this gentleman...
Page 30 - And as several of these are observed to accompany each other, they come to be marked by one name, and so to be reputed as one thing. Thus, for example, a certain colour, taste, smell, figure and consistence, having been observed to go together, are accounted one distinct thing, signified by the name "apple.
Page 15 - For example, does it not require some pains and skill to form the general idea of a triangle (which is yet none of v the most abstract, comprehensive, and difficult) ; for it must be neither oblique nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon, but all and none of these at once?
Page 29 - It is evident to any one who takes a survey of the objects of [human knowledge, that they are either ideas actually imprinted on the senses ; or else such as are perceived by attending to the passions and operations of the mind ; or lastly, ideas formed by help of memory and imagination either compounding, dividing, or barely representing those originally perceived in the aforesaid ways.
Page 31 - For what are the forementioned objects but the things we perceive by sense, and what do we perceive besides our own ideas or sensations; and is it not plainly repugnant that any one of these or any combination of them should exist unperceived?
Page 118 - We may not I think strictly be said to have an idea of an active being, or of an action, although we may be said to have a notion of them.
Page 12 - I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For it is evident we observe no footsteps in them, of making use of general signs for universal ideas ; from which we have reason to imagine, that they have not the faculty of abstracting, or making general ideas, since they have no use of words,...
Page 21 - It is one thing for to keep a name constantly to the same definition, and another to make it stand everywhere for the same idea ' : the one is necessary, the other useless and impracticable.
Page 115 - spirit" we mean only that which thinks, wills, and perceives; this, and this alone, constitutes the signification of that term.
Page 123 - Ye who turn judgment to wormwood, and leave off righteousness in the earth, seek him that maketh the seven stars and Orion, and turneth the shadow of death into the morning, and maketh the day dark with night: that calleth for the waters of the sea, and poureth them out upon the face of the earth: The Lord is his name: that strengtheneth the spoiled against the strong, so that the spoiled shall come against the fortress.

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