A New System of Mercantile Arithmetic: Adapted to the Commerce of the United States, in Its Domestic and Foreign Relations : with Forms of Accounts and Other Writings Usually Occurring in Trade (Google eBook)

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Edmund M. Blunt, 1801 - Arithmetic - 252 pages
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Page 252 - Ship called the whereof is Master for this present Voyage and now riding at Anchor in the and bound for to say being marked and numbered as in the Margin, and are to be delivered in the like good order and well conditioned...
Page 84 - Reduce compound fractions to simple ones, and mixt numbers to improper fractions ; then multiply the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators for. a new denominator.
Page 75 - The number above the line is called the numerator, and that below the line the denominator. The denominator...
Page 56 - RULE. Divide as in whole numbers, and from the right hand of the quotient point off as many places for decimals as the decimal places in the dividend exceed those in the divisor.
Page 77 - Multiply all the numerators together for a new numerator, and all the denominators for a new denominator: then reduce the new fraction to its lowest terms.
Page 60 - Multiply the decimal by the number of parts in the next less denomination, and cut off so many places for a remainder, to the right hand, as there are places in the given decimal. 2. Multiply the remainder by the next inferior denomination, and cut off...
Page 18 - First, commit the words at the head of the table, viz. units, tens,^ hundreds, &c. to memory, then, to the simple value of each figure, join the name of its place, beginning at the left hand, and reading towards the right.
Page 219 - Find the first figure in the root, by the table of powers, which subtract from the given number. 3. Bring down the first figure in the next point to the remainder, and call it the dividend. 4. Involve the root into the next inferior power to that which is given ; multiply it by the given power, and call it the divisor. 5. Find a quotient figure by common division, and annex it to the root ; then involve the whole root into the given power, and call that the subtrahend.

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