Deep-Sky Companions: The Messier Objects

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 28, 1998 - Nature - 304 pages
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If there were a canon for viewing the night sky, Charles Messier would be its author. The galaxies, star clusters, and nebulae cataloged by the famous comet hunter in the late 1700s are still the most widely observed celestial wonders in the heavens. They are the favorite targets of amateur astronomers, with such rich variety and detail that they never cease to fascinate. This book provides new and experienced observers with a fresh perspective on the Messier objects. Stephen James O'Meara has prepared a visual feast for the observer. Using the finest optical telescopes available for amateur work, he describes and sketches the view from the telescope as never before. There are new drawings, improved finder charts, and new astronomical data on each object, including findings from the Hubble Space Telescope. Expand your universe and test your viewing acumen with this truly modern Messier Guide. It is a must for budding night watchers. Stephen James O'Meara is a contributing editor to Sky and Telescope.
  

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I love this book. It's not what I would want if I were sitting at home studying, but out at a star party... it's perfect. You can look up any object easily and read about it quickly. Very helpful, and David Levy approves*.
*For those of you who don't know, these objects are of particular concern to comet hunters, including Messier himself.
 

Contents

HOW to observe the Messier objects
9
The making of this book
25
The Messier objects
39
some thoughts on CharIes Messier
285
APPENDIX
299
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

The author of the celebrated 1998 book Deep-Sky Companions: The Messier Objects, O'Meara has spent much of his career on the editorial staff of Sky & Telescope magazine.

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