Foundations of Comparative Politics (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 1, 2005 - Political Science
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This authoritative new introductory text covers the key concepts, theories and issues involved in the study of comparative politics. Focusing on democratic government, it covers all important topics in the field from constitutional design and institutions; through mass and elite politics, groups, parties, the media and governments; to policy making and implementation. The final chapter considers the future of the state and democracy in a globalising world. The authors draw on experiences and examples from around the world, and the book includes extensive supporting apparatus for students and teachers, including briefings, fact files, key terms, guides to further reading, and related websites. Each chapter ends with a section dealing with the major theoretical approaches to the subject. The aim is to give students a clear and comprehensive account of democratic politics and government at the start of the twenty first century.
  

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Contents

X
3
XI
4
XII
8
XIII
11
XIV
17
XV
20
XVII
21
XVIII
22
LXXXVII
179
LXXXVIII
180
LXXXIX
181
XC
182
XCI
184
XCII
189
XCIII
192
XCIV
195

XIX
23
XX
26
XXI
29
XXII
30
XXIII
34
XXIV
37
XXVI
38
XXVII
39
XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
52
XXXII
53
XXXIII
58
XXXV
59
XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLV
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XLVI
74
XLVII
76
XLVIII
92
L
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LI
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
100
LV
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LVI
106
LVII
111
LVIII
115
LX
116
LXI
117
LXII
118
LXIII
122
LXIV
123
LXV
125
LXVI
126
LXVII
130
LXIX
131
LXX
133
LXXI
135
LXXII
136
LXXIII
146
LXXIV
154
LXXV
156
LXXVI
157
LXXVII
158
LXXVIII
159
LXXIX
160
LXXX
164
LXXXI
169
LXXXII
172
LXXXIII
173
LXXXIV
174
LXXXV
176
LXXXVI
178
XCV
198
XCVII
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XCVIII
200
XCIX
202
C
209
CI
215
CII
219
CIV
220
CV
221
CVI
222
CVII
223
CVIII
224
CIX
229
CX
231
CXI
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CXII
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CXIV
238
CXV
239
CXVI
241
CXVII
242
CXVIII
244
CXIX
256
CXX
260
CXXII
261
CXXIII
263
CXXIV
264
CXXV
266
CXXVI
273
CXXVII
279
CXXVIII
282
CXXIX
283
CXXXI
284
CXXXII
285
CXXXIII
286
CXXXIV
291
CXXXV
295
CXXXVI
297
CXXXVII
299
CXXXVIII
303
CXL
305
CXLI
306
CXLII
307
CXLIII
309
CXLIV
316
CXLV
320
CXLVI
322
CXLVII
326
CXLVIII
327
CXLIX
328
CL
329
CLI
330
CLII
336
CLIII
338
CLIV
342
CLV
343
CLVI
344
CLVII
345
CLVIII
346
CLIX
363
CLX
366
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - Men are born and remain free and equal in rights. Social distinctions may be founded only upon the general good. 2. The aim of all political association is the preservation of the natural and imprescriptible rights of man. These rights are liberty, property, security, and resistance to oppression.
Page 10 - No Contracting State shall expel or return ("refouler") a refugee in any manner whatsoever to the frontiers of territories where his life or freedom would be threatened on account of his race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.
Page 6 - Every state is a community of some kind, and every community is established with a view to some good; for mankind always act in order to obtain that which they think good. But, if all communities aim at some good, the state or political community, which is the highest of all, and which embraces all the rest, aims at good in a greater degree than any other, and at the highest good.
Page 11 - A compulsory political organization with continuous operations (politischer Anstaltsbetrieb) will be called a "state" insofar as its administrative staff successfully upholds the claim to the monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force in the enforcement of its order.

About the author (2005)

Ken Newton is Professor of Comparative Politics at the University of Southampton. He previously taught at the University of Essex, and was Director of the European Consortium for Political Research. Among his publications is the successful textbook The New British Politics (Longman).

Jan W. van Deth is Professor of Political Science and International Comparative Social Research at the University of Mannheim, Germany. His main research areas are political culture (especially social capital and citizenship), social change, and comparative research methods.

Bibliographic information