A Chronological Register of Both Houses of the British Parliament, from the Union in 1708, to the Third Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in 1807, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1807 - Great Britain
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Page 259 - That it is a high infringement of the liberties and privileges of the Commons of the United Kingdom...
Page 112 - that the presence of a regular body of armed soldiers at an election of members to serve in Parliament is a high infringement of the liberties of the subject, a manifest violation of the freedom of elections, and an open defiance of the laws and constitution of this kingdom...
Page 464 - That no mayor, bailiff or other officer of a borough, who is the proper officer to whom the precept ought to be directed, is capable of being elected to serve in parliament for the same borough of which he is mayor, bailiff or officer at the time of the election...
Page 233 - Feb. 1693; in the citizens not receiving alms, and admitted to their freedom by birth or servitude, or by redemption, in order to trade within the city, llth Feb.
Page 118 - That Robert Walpole, Esq., a member of this House, in receiving the sum of five hundred guineas...
Page 476 - Crown, and business could recommence, a motion was made, " that Sir John Trevor, late Speaker of this House, being guilty of a high crime and misdemeanour, by receiving a gratuity of 1000 guineas from the City of London after passing the Orphans...
Page 118 - ... hundred more, on account of two contracts for forage of her majesty's troops, quartered in North Britain, made by him when secretary at war, pursuant to a power granted to him by tiie late lord-treasurer, is guilty of a high breach of trust and notorious corruption.
Page 430 - Culpepper, the house resolved, that the latter had been not only guilty of corrupt, scandalous, and indirect practices, in endeavouring to procure himself to be elected a burgess; but likewise, being one of the instruments in promoting and presenting the scandalous, insolent, and seditious petition, commonly called the Kentish petition to the last house of commons...
Page 439 - Chancellor and some of the judges to be of the same opinion ; but that' they had not thought it proper to inquire of the Chancellor what he had done, because they thought it prejudicial to the privilege of the House to have the same determined by others than such as were members thereof. And though they thought very reverently of the said Lord Chancellor and judges, and knew them to be competent judges in their places, yet in this case they took them not for judges in Parliament in this House...
Page 209 - That there were notorious and outrageous riots, tumults and seditions, at the late election of citizens to serve in Parliament for the City of Coventry, in defiance of the civil authority, and in violation of the freedom of elections...

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