Animal Play: Evolutionary, Comparative and Ecological Perspectives

Front Cover
Marc Bekoff, John A. Byers
Cambridge University Press, Jun 4, 1998 - Psychology - 274 pages
0 Reviews
Why do animals play? Play has been described in animals as diverse as reptiles, birds and mammals, so what benefits does it provide and how did it evolve? Careful, quantitative studies of social, locomotor and object play behavior are now beginning to answer these questions and shed light on many other aspects of both animal and human behavior. This unique interdisciplinary volume brings together the major findings about play in a wide range of species including humans. Topics about play include the evolutionary history of play, play structure, function and development, and sex and individual differences. Animal Play is destined to become the benchmark volume in this subject for many years to come, and will provide a source of inspiration and understanding for students and researchers in behavioral biology, neurobiology, psychology and anthropology.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The evolutionary origins of play revisited lessons from turtles
1
Play in common ravens Corvus corax
27
Object play by adult animals
45
Kangaroos at play play behaviour in the Macropodoidea
61
Intentional communication and social play how and why animals negotiate and agree to play
97
The structurefunction interface in the analysis of play fighting
115
Sparring as play in young pronghorn males
141
Squirrel monkey playfighting making the case for a cognitive training function for play
161
Self assessment in juvenile play
183
Biological effects of locomotor play getting into shape or something more specific?
205
Neurobiological substrates of play behavior glimpses into the structure and function of mammalian playfulness
221
Play as an organizing principle clinical evidence and personal observations
243
Index
261
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 240 - Morgan, JI, and Curran, T. (1991). Stimulus-transcription coupling in the nervous system: involvement of the inducible proto-oncogenes fos and jun.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

Marc Bekoff is professor of biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is the author of many books, including Minding Animals: Awareness, Emotions and Heart, and is a former Guggenheim Fellow and a Fellow of the Animal Behavior Society. Bekoff is also regional coordinator for Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots program, which promotes environmental awareness and community involvement of young people, senior citizens, and prisoners in over seventy countries through education and hands-on activities.

John A. Byers is Professor of Zoology, University of Idaho.

Bibliographic information