Homage to Gaia: The Life of an Independent Scientist

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Oxford University Press, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 428 pages
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With over fifty patents to his name and a stream of awards--including one from the Queen of England--James Lovelock is a distinguished scientist who has been widely recognized by the international scientific community.

In this inspiring autobiography, Lovelock tells the story of his life as an independent scientist--from his first job as a lab assistant to his energetic crusade to save the ozone layer. We see how Lovelock came to develop his inventions and theories--he recounts the history behind his famous Gaia theory and talks us through his many inventions. We learn about the electron capture detector, which was extremely important in the development of environmental awareness, revealing for the first time the ubiquitous distribution of pesticide residues in the environment and the global distribution of CFCs. He talks about his work with NASA, where his ideas were adopted in the program for planetary exploration. And he tells about the work he has done for organizations like the Ministry of Defence, The Marine Biological Association, and companies such as Shell and Hewlett Packard.

Written in a sharp and energetic style, James Lovelock's book will entertain and inspire anyone interested in science or the creative spirit.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Childhood
7
The Long Apprenticeship
39
Twenty Years of Medical Research
69
The Voyage on HMS Vengeance in 1949
91
The Mill Hill Institute
105
The Year in Boston
116
My Last Years at the Mill Hill Institute
125
The Ozone War
203
The Voyage of the Shackleton in 19712
208
The Voyage of the Meteor in 1973
229
The Quest for Gaia
241
The Practical Side of Independent Science
281
Computers
291
The Royal Society
295
The Marine Biological Association
298

The First Steps to Independence at Houston Texas
147
The Independent Practice of Science
155
Shell
161
The Security Services
169
Hewlett Packard
180
Inventions
186
The ECD
191
Living in Ireland
303
Coombe Mill
314
Building Your Own Bypass
327
Three Score Years and Ten and then the Fun Begins
371
Epilogue
409
Index
421
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

James Lovelock is an independent scientist, inventor, and author. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1974 and in 1975 received the Tswett Medal for Chromatography. In 1988 he was a recipient of the Norbert Gerbier Prize of the World Meteorological Organization, and in 1990 was awarded the first Amsterdam Prize for the Environment by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Further awards include the Nonino Prize and the Volvo Environment Prize in 1996, and Japan's Blue Planet prize in 1997. Her Majesty the Queen made him a CBE in 1990. One of his inventions is the electron capture detector, which was important in the development of environmental awareness. It revealed for the first time the ubiquitous distribution of pesticide residues. He co-operated with NASA and some of his inventions were adopted in their programme of planetory explanation.

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