The Worcester Magazine: Devoted to Good Citizenship and Municipal Development, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Chamber of Commerce, 1901 - Worcester (Mass.)
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 53 - I grant you to be all law-worthy as you were in the days of King Edward: and I grant that every child shall be his father's heir, after his father's days; and I will not suffer any person to do you wrong. God keep you.
Page 180 - Record and at least twice in two daily newspapers published in the city to be designated by the mayor at the expense of the proposed grantee. Such ordinance shall on its introduction and first reading be referred by the municipal assembly to the board of estimate and apportionment...
Page 50 - Worcester shall, without being limited to any particular system, within four years after the passage of this act, remove from its sewage, before it is discharged into the Blackstone river, the offensive and polluting properties and substances therein, so that after its discharge into said river, either directly or through its tributaries, it shall not create a nuisance or endanger the public health.
Page 127 - The socalled problems of the modern city are but the various phases of the one main question: How can the environment be most perfectly adapted to the welfare of urban populations? And science can meet and answer every one of these problems.
Page 127 - CHAP. i. themselves physically, and providing themselves with the appointments of civilization, because they have t made the great discovery that their new masses of population are to remain permanently. They have in practice rejected the old view that the evils of city life were inevitable, and have begun to remedy them, and to prove that city life can be made not tolerable only for working-men and their families, but positively wholesome and desirable.
Page 127 - ... most desirable results. Mr. Shaw says : I am not willing to deduce any pessimistic conclusions from this general tendency, whether exhibited in England, in Germany, or in America. I do not for a moment believe that modern cities are hastening on to bankruptcy, that they are becoming dangerously socialistic in the range of their municipal activities, or that the high and even higher rates of local taxation thus far indicate anything detrimental to the general welfare. It all means simply that...
Page 174 - The pressure," says Dr. Albert Shaw, "that would be brought to bear on the government to produce corruption under municipal ownership of monopolies like gas, electric light, transit, etc., would be incomparably less than the pressure that is now brought to bear by the corporations. The wear and tear upon the morals of a weak municipal government are greater by far when it comes to the task of granting franchises that is to say of making bargains with private corporations than when it is attempted...
Page 180 - July, in the year one thousand nine hundred and one, by and between THE CITY OF NEW YORK, by the Board of Estimate and Apportionment of said City, party of the first part, and THE...
Page 126 - ... and there has been no desire to construct an argument or to defend a thesis. Nevertheless, certain fundamental views have undoubtedly exercised so strong an influence upon the mode of inquiry pursued, that a preliminary statement or two may be permitted as furnishing the key to all that follows. Since life in cities, under new and artificial conditions, is henceforth the providential lot assigned to the majority of families, it is to be accepted as a permanent fact for this generation and its...
Page 126 - For the present evils of city life are temporary and remediable. The abolition of the slums, and the destruction of their virus, are as feasible as the drainage of a swamp and the total dissipation of its miasmas. The conditions and circumstances that surround the lives of the masses of people in modern cities can be so adjusted to their needs as to result in the highest development of the race, in body, in mind and in moral character.

Bibliographic information